Category Archives: My Photography

60 Photos of EXPO Chicago 2018, Festival Hall, Navy Pier. Seventh Annual International Exposition of Contemporary & Modern Art, September 27-30, 2018.

Expo Chicago/2018 is the 7th annual exhibition of international contemporary and modern art held in Chicago at Navy Pier’s Festival Hall. It took place September 27-30, 2018. Expo Chicago/2018 presented 135 galleries and exhibitors representing 27 countries and 63 cities from around the world. This post’s 60 photographs are of that event.

Expo Chicago/2018 includes exhibitors four sections categorized to a specific aim:
Exposure are galleries founded since 2010 featuring one or two artists;
Profile are international galleries featuring solo or collective artists with focused installations, exhibitions and projects;
Editions + Books highlight artist books, editions, prints, collectibles, photography, collage, drawing, etc.;
Special Exhibitions” feature site specific work.

More Expo Chicago/2018 sections include:
IN/SITU highlighting curated large-scale installations (a second, outside version features large-scale sculptures in various Chicago locations);
EXPO VIDEO highlighting curated film, video and new media work;
EXPO SOUND highlighting curated sound installations and projects.

Expo Chicago/2018 was held in Festival Hall on Navy Pier in Chicago. The annual event, held since 2012, is in its seventh year.

Expo Chicago/2018 attracts thousands of attendees to visit with hundreds of gallery owners and artists from all over the world.

Expo Chicago is a major modern and contemporary art event held each year to open the Fall art season. It is held nearby to downtown Chicago and the Magnificent Mile on historic Navy Pier which is one of Chicago’s most popular tourist magnets.

One of the information desks at Expo Chicago/2018.

Expo Chicago/2018 welcomed 135 international art galleries from 27 countries and 63 cities.

Georgia Scherman Projects, Toronto. Within the framework of the show’s sections, each booth showcases the artwork of their choosing .

The artwork of Marcus Jansen was featured at Casterline/ Goodman Gallery, Aspen, CO, Chicago, and Nantucket, MA.

Artist Gina Pellón (center) at Cerunda Arte, Coral Gables, FL.

Surrealist painter Fred Stonehouse, Night King, 2018, acrylic on canvas, Tory Folliard Gallery, Milwaukee, WI.

Richard Hughes, Hot Step, 2017, cast polyester resin and enamel paint, Anton Kern Gallery, New York.

Ridley Howard, Blue Dress, Blue Sky, 2016, acrylic on linen, Frederic Snitzer Gallery, Miami, FL.

Admissions.

Library Street Collective, Detroit, MI.         

Artist Francesco Clemente, 2018, oil on canvas at Maruani Mercier Gallery, Brussels, Belgium.

Artwork of Larry Poons, Yares Art, New York, Palm Springs, Santa Fe.

Artwork of Austin White, 2018, Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco and New York.

In/Situ: Postcommodity, Repellent Fence, 2015, Bockley Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Peter Blake Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA.

Artwork by Asmund Havsteen Mikkelsen at the booth shared by Fold Gallery, London, and Galleri Kant, Copenhagen.

Prune Nourry, River Man (detail), 2018, patinated copper tubes, Galerie Templon, Paris.

Gérard Garouste, The Eagle Owl and the One-Eared Woman, 2016, Galerie Templon, Paris.

Two views of Jaume Plensa’s Laura Asia in White, 2017, polyester resin and marble dust, at Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago.

William Kentridge, Blue Rubrics, 2018, lapis lazuli pigment on thesaurus pages, NFP Field Tate Editions, Royal Academy of Arts, London.

Frances Stark, According to This…, 2018, Silk screen on linen on panel, Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York and Rome.

David Driskell, Jazz Singer (Lady of Leisure, Fox), 1974, oil and collage on canvas, DC Moore New York City.

Jansson Stegner, Swordswoman, 2018, oil on linen, Nino Mier Gallery, Los Angeles.

Brian Calvin, Eternal Return, 2009, acrylic on canvas, Anton Kern Gallery, New York.

Margot Bergman, Gloria, 2014, acrylic on linen, Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago.

Ceysson & Bénétière, New York Luxembourg Paris Saint-Étienne.

Julie Heffernan, Self-Portrait with Nuala, 2018, oil on canvas, Zolla/Lieberman Chicago.

Chloe Wise, You would have been a castle for a moment, 2016, Galerie Division, Montreal and Toronto.

Expo Chicago/2018.

Expo Chicago/2018.

2018 artworks of Devan Shimoyama, De Buck Gallery New York City.

Expo Chicago/2018.

Chie Fueki, Kyle, 2017, DC Moore Gallery, New York City.

Naudline Pierre, Deal Kindly and Truly With Me, 2018, oil on canvas, 56 x 52 inches, Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles.

Clare Sherman, Sea Cave, 2017, oil on canvas, 84 x 66 in., DC Moore Gallery, New York City.

Roberto Fabelo, Gothic Habanero, n.d., oil on canvas, Cerunda Arte, Coral Gables, FL.

Expo Chicago/2018 brings a world of modern and contemporary art to Chicago for the collector.

Expo Chicago/2018 offers the art lover in one place a plethora of opportunities to encounter the latest in modern and contemporary art from around the world.

Expo Chicago/2018 covers tens of thousands of square feet with modern and contemporary art of many kinds from 27 countries and 63 global cities.

A quiet moment with modern art.

Sculpture, painting, and other visual art forms were in evidence at Expo Chicago/2018. There is a popular on-site cafe that serves snacks and beverages.

Expo Chicago/2018.

Sharing smiles at Expo Chicago/2018.

A point of artistic interest at Expo Chicago/2018 brings out the cellphones.

Juan Roberto Diago, Grito, 1997. The artist talks about his artistic debt to Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Fort Gansevoort, New York City.

The latest artwork of Nick Dawes, 2018, Galerie Kornfeld, Berlin.

Tsailing Tseng, Black Moor Everything, Everything, 2018, oil on linen, Tuttle Fellowship.

Roberto Lugo, porcelain china, paint, luster, 2018, Wexler Gallery, Philadelphia. PA.

Lavar Munroe, Spy Boy, 2018, acrylic and earring stud on canvas, Jenkins Johnson Gallery San Francisco New York.

In/Situ: Ivan Argote, Among Us — Across History…, 2017.

Richard Hudson, Tear, 2016, polished mirrored steel, Michael Goedhuis London Beijing New York.


Aniela Sobieksi,  Girl with a Garden, 2018, oil on panel, Tory Folliard Gallery, Milwaukee. The painting next to it sold right before I took this photograph.

The Hole NYC.

Barnaby Barford, Celebrity, 2018 , Giclée Print, David Gill Gallery, London.

All photographs and text©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system. (CR)

Mural: Sea of Flags, 2004, by Gamaliel Ramirez, Chicago, Illinois.

SEA OF FLAGS, 2004, 2500 West Division Street, Chicago (Humboldt Park) by Gamaliel Ramirez (b. 1949) with the assistance of community members.  

The mural entitled Sea of Flags depicts Fiesta Boricua (De Bandera a Bandera), an annual 3-day music and cultural event in the Humboldt Park neighborhood in Chicago. Attracting tens of thousands of visitors, the fiesta is held starting in late August or early September. In 2018 the Fiesta Boricua celebrated its 25th anniversary and offered 3 stages booked back to back with scores of musical and cultural performers specializing in the pulsating rhythms of Puerto Rican salsa, reggaeton, bomba, plena, and merengue music, and more.

Some of the famous people depicted in the mural Sea of Flags include Puerto Rican nationalist Lolita Lebrón (1919-2010), Nuyorican (“New York City/Puerto Rico”) poet and playwright Pedro Pietri (1944-2004) and, depicted as a bronze statue on the image’s left side, Don Pedro Albizu Campos (1891-1965), the leading figure in the Puerto Rican independence movement.

An abundance of Puerto Rican flags in the mural is intentional by the artist and his assistants. Since Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the United States in 1898 following the Spanish-American War — and at the same time that Spain ceded the island of Guam and the Philippines — Puerto Rico and the U.S. have had a complicated political relationship that is yet to be completely mutually resolved today.

Gamaliel Ramirez was born in the Bronx in New York in 1949. He spent most of his career in Chicago teaching and as a working artist. After 35 years in Chicago he retired to Santa Rita, San Juan, Puerto Rico. After Hurricane Maria in September 2017, Mr. Ramirez was hospitalized for many months and passed away on May 21, 2018. The artist of this colorful mural has left behind for us a legacy of paintings, other murals, photography and poetry.

A Visit to The Shrine of Christ’s Passion in St. John, Indiana.

Text and photographs by John P. Walsh

INTRODUCTION

One hour’s drive (about 40 miles) south of downtown Chicago– and 90 minutes drive from the University of Notre Dame near South Bend, Indiana, is The Shrine of Christ’s Passion. Within a 30-acre site whose landscaped rocks, hills, and trees envelop the visitor, the shrine is located on busy U.S. 41 at 10630 Wicker Avenue in St. John, Indiana. A pioneer town settled in 1837, St. John still sits among farm fields though there is increasingly more development only minutes from the Indiana-Illinois state line.

On the historic Wachter family farm, the level terrain is a perfect outdoor setting for an array of multi-media and interactive attractions. Most visitors, whether as individuals or in groups, come to the shrine to traverse the half-mile winding concrete pathway that contain over 40 life-sized bronze sculptures which dramatize the Passion of Jesus Christ in the Bible.

The visit to the shrine begins in the well-stocked gift shop and leads directly outdoors to the dramatization of Jesus at The Last Supper and into the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus prays. This is followed by the 14 traditional Stations of the Cross. The visit ends at Jesus’s empty tomb and his appearance to Mary Magdalene. Finally there is the dramatic Ascension of the Risen Jesus into Heaven on Mount Olivet.  

The shrine opened in 2011 and added its latest attractions in 2017. This is a re-creation of the rock-filled path up Mount Sinai to where Moses has received the 10 Commandments.

The Shrine of Christ’s Passion required a decade of planning and over $10 million dollars to build. Each setting or station for Christ’s passion has an orientation kiosk. Each features the well-known recorded voice of American television journalist Bill Kurtis. A push of a button has Mr. Kurtis’s voice over the kiosks’ speakers provide a clear and brief description in English of the sculptures’ scenes followed by a short meditation.

Along the broad concrete pathway the prayer trail is meditative and its easy progression from station to station lends itself to discovery. Formed hills, planted trees, bushes, and grasses as well as many large boulders, provide a complete landscape far from the outside world. The design creates a terrain that is self-contained and works to evoke the arid climate of the Holy Land where the last days of Christ can become vibrant today.

Upon exiting the gift shop with its walls and shelves of tempting religious articles and other items for purchase — all proceeds apparently go to the upkeep of the shrine– one steps into an outdoor pastoral setting which offers the immediate transition into the world of the Bible and following in the footsteps of Christ during his darkest moments. Visitors share the trail with others from around the nation and world. This is part of what makes each visit to the shrine unique and alive. Yet there is ample space and freedom to enjoy one’s own completely personal experience.

Whenever one may visit the shrine — it is open 361 days a year– the prayer trail has an atmosphere that is quiet and respectful. There is always a place to sit and drink in the sculpture art detailing the greatest story ever told. Among its flora, evocative rock and land formations, and realistically-rendered life-sized sculptures depicting Jesus Christ’s suffering –- one witnesses in a a new way Christ’s mission which triumphed over sin and death. 

A large and impressive place, The Shrine of Christ’s Passion retains a human scale along with giving the visitor a sense of being serenely out in nature.  Depending on how much time a visitor can spend, a visit to the shrine could possibly be accomplished in as little as 30 minutes though at least an hour should be allowed to see and savor everything it has to offer.

In addition to the main prayer trail and gift shop, the shrine includes more attractions such as the Moses, Mount Sinai, and the 10 Commandments trail; The Sanctity of Life Shrine; and Our Lady of The New Millennium, a monumental three-story (34 feet) tall statue of the Virgin Mary constructed out of over 8,000 pounds of stainless steel.

The Shrine is operated by a non-denominational nonprofit, private foundation. Admission to all attractions at the shrine is free. The Shrine is open daily from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Thursdays until 8:00 p.m. The Prayer Trail is open year round, weather permitting.  

Sources –
The Shrine of Christ’s Passion Official website – http://shrineofchristspassion.org/
Our Lady of the New Millennium – https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-2011-03-04-ct-talk-mary-statue-0305-20110304-story.html

PHOTOGRAPHS

Main Entrance on U.S. 41 at 10630 Wicker Avenue in St. John, Indiana, minutes from the Illinois-Indiana state line. Just 40 minutes from downtown Chicago, there is ample free parking and tour buses are welcome.

The Gift Shoppe.

The Last Supper Luke 22:19

“And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me.”

Garden of Gethsemane Mark 14:34

“My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death,” Jesus said to them. “Stay here and keep watch.”

THE 14 STATIONS OF THE CROSS AT THE SHRINE OF CHRIST’S PASSION, ST. JOHN, INDIANA.

1. Jesus is condemned to death Matthew 27: 19-26

“Pilate had Jesus flogged, and handed him over to be crucified.”

2. Jesus carries His cross John 19:16-17

“Carrying his own cross, he went out to the place of the Skull (which in Aramaic is called Golgotha).”

3. Jesus falls for the first time Isaiah 53:1-3

“He was despised and rejected by mankind,
    a man of suffering, and familiar with pain.
Like one from whom people hide their faces
    he was despised, and we held him in low esteem.”

4. Jesus meets His mother, Mary Lamentations 1:12

“Is it nothing to you, all you who pass by?
    Look around and see.
Is any suffering like my suffering
    that was inflicted on me..?”

5. Simon of Cyrene helps Jesus carry the cross Luke 23:26

“They seized Simon from Cyrene, who was on his way in from the country, and put the cross on him and made him carry it behind Jesus.”

6. Veronica wipes the face of Jesus Psalm 17:15

“As for me, I will be vindicated and will see your face;
    when I awake, I will be satisfied with seeing your likeness.”

7. Jesus falls for the second time   Isaiah 53:4-6

“Surely he took up our pain
    and bore our suffering,
yet we considered him punished by God,
    stricken by him, and afflicted.”

8. Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem Luke 23:27-31

“A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. 28 Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children.”

9. Jesus falls for the third time Isaiah 53:10-11

“Yet it was the Lord’s will to crush him and cause him to suffer,
    and though the Lord makes his life an offering for sin,
he will see his offspring and prolong his days,
    and the will of the Lord will prosper in his hand….”

10. Jesus is stripped of His clothes Matthew 27:27-31

“They stripped him and put a scarlet robe on him, and then twisted together a crown of thorns and set it on his head. They put a staff in his right hand. Then they knelt in front of him and mocked him.”

11. Jesus is nailed to the cross Luke 23:33-34

“When they came to the place called the Skull, they crucified him there, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left.”

12. Jesus dies on the cross­ Luke 23:44-49

 “Jesus called out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.” When he had said this, he breathed his last.”

13. Jesus is taken down from the cross Mark 15:39

“When the centurion who stood facing him saw how Jesus breathed his last he said, ‘Truly this man was the Son of God!'”

14. Jesus is placed in the tomb Luke 23:50-53

“Going to Pilate, Joseph of Arimathea asked for Jesus’ body. Then he took it down, wrapped it in linen cloth and placed it in a tomb cut in the rock, one in which no one had yet been laid.”

Jesus Appears to Mary Magdalene John 20:16

 “Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned toward him and cried out in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” 

Images from the Prayer Trail

The Ascension Acts of the Apostles 1:9

“…Jesus was taken up before their very eyes, and a cloud hid him from their sight.”

Introduction and all Photographs ©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.


Maui Hawaii, May 1988: Photographs I Forgot I Had, USA.

Ka’anapali Beach, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Road to Hana, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Cockatoo, Hyatt Regency Maui, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Bronze Buddha, Thailand, 19th Century, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Bodhisattva,Hyatt Regency Maui, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Main Pool, Hyatt Regency Maui, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Footpath, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Free Form Pool, Hyatt Regency Maui, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Lahina Roads, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Road to Hana, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Hookipa Beach, Wind Surfing, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Kaʻahumanu Church (1876), Wailuku, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Sugar Cane, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

West Maui Mountains, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Iao Needle, Iao Valley State Park Monument, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Self Portrait, Wailuku, Maui, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988

West Maui Mountains, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Cambodian Buddha, Maui, Hawaii, May 13, 1988.

Evening, Maui, Hawaii, May 12, 1988.

EXPO Chicago 2017, September 13-17. Sixth Annual International Exposition of Contemporary & Modern Art. (34 photos).

Expo Chicago/2017 is the 6th annual exhibition of international contemporary and modern art held in Chicago at Navy Pier’s Festival Hall. It took place September 13-17, 2017. Expo Chicago/2017 presented 135 galleries representing 25 countries and 58 cities from around the world.

This post’s 34 photographs are of that event.

Expo Chicago 2017
Expo Chicago 2017.

Brian Calvin, Momentary Monument, 2017
Brian Calvin, Momentary Monument, 2017, acrylic on canvas, Anton Kern Gallery, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017Admissions, Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017
Information desk, Expo Chicago 2017.

Lara Schnitger, Suffragette City, 2015-2017.Lara Schnitger, Suffragette City, 2015-2017, Cotton, and linen, quilted and bleached, Anton Kern Gallery, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

The War We Won, Roger Brown, 1991
The War We Won, Roger Brown, oil on canvas, 80 x 120 in., Kavi Gupta Gallery, Chicago. Expo Chicago 2017.

Doug Argue, Dream Song 12, 2017
Doug Argue, Dream Song 12, 2017, oil on paper, 40,x,60 in., Marc Straus, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

CarrerasMugica Contemporary Art Gallery, Bilbao
CarrerasMugica Contemporary Art Gallery, Bilbao. Expo Chicago 2017.

Galerie Gmurzynska, Zurich, SwitzerlandGalerie Gmurzynska, Zurich, Switzerland, with booth design by Antonio Manfreda. Expo Chicago 2017.

Matthew Monahan, Hurricane Nickel, 2016 and Aquarius Gemini, 2016.
Matthew Monahan, Hurricane Nickel, 2016, and Aquarius Gemini, 2016, Anton Kern Gallery, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Anton Kern Gallery, New YorkAnton Kern Gallery, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Rita McBride, Halicarnassus and Pantheon 2.
Rita McBride, Halicarnassus, 2010, bronze and grey limestone, and Pantheon 2, bronze and markina marble, CarrerasMugica Contemporary Art Gallery, Bibao. Expo Chicago 2017.

Wardell Milan
Wardell Milan, The New Sun Will Warm our Proud and Naked Bodies, 2016, charcoal, oil, oil pastel, pastel, gesso, acrylic, color pencil, cut paper on paper, David Nolan Gallery, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Meleko Mokgosi
Meleko Mokgosi, Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles. Expo Chicago 2017.

John SealJohn A. Seal, König Galerie, Berlin. Expo Chicago 2017.

Alan Stone Projects, New YorkAlfred Leslie, Oval Collage, 1959, Diana Moore, White Head, 1988  and Willem de Kooning, 1965, charcoal on paper, Alan Stone Projects, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017Thinks I, To Myself. Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017.
Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017
Expo Chicago 2017.

Rhona Hoffman Gallery Expo Chicago 2017Jackie Saccoccio, Portrait (Bomba), 2017, and Faheem Majeed, Hopscotch I,  2011, and Pause, 2010, Rhona Hoffman Gallery Chicago. Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017
Expo Chicago 2017.

Garth Greenan Gallery New York
Garth Greenan Gallery, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Iva Gueorguieva, Listen, 2017
Iva Gueorguieva, Listen, 2017, acrylic oil collage on canvas, Miles McEnery Gallery, New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Hayal Pozanti
Hayal Pozanti, 70 (million m.p.h that the earth orbit around the sun), 2017, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 132 in., Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco, California. Expo Chicago 2017.

Lavar Munroe, Instinctual, 2017
Lavar Munroe, Instinctual, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 42 in., Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco. Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017
Expo Chicago 2017.

Peres Projects Berlin
Peres Projects Berlin. Expo Chicago 2017.

Ransome Stanley, Untitled, 2017
Ransome Stanley, Untitled, 2017, oil on canvas, 59 x 78 in., Gallery MOMO, South Africa. Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017
Booth 839, Expo Chicago 2017.

Caroline WalkerCaroline Walker, Grimm Gallery Amsterdam New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Expo Chicago 2017
Expo Chicago 2017.

Nicolas Africano
Nicolas Africano, Untitled, 2017, cast glass, Weinstein Gallery Minneapolis. Expo Chicago 2017.

Paul Kasmin Gallery New YorkPaul Kasmin Gallery New York. Expo Chicago 2017.

Miro 1925Artist’s Signature (Miró). Expo Chicago 2017.

©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

Braddock Road: Twelve Springs Camp, Pennsylvania.

National PikeThe Braddock Road, south-central Pennsylvania, March 20, 2010.

The Braddock Road was a military road built in 1755 in what was then British America and is now the United States. It was the first improved road to cross the barrier of the ridge lines of the Appalachians. It was constructed by about 2,500 troops of the Virginia militia and British regulars commanded by General Edward Braddock (1695-1755), part of the expedition to conquer the Ohio Country from the French at the beginning of the French and Indian War (1756-63). George Washington, who was aide-de-camp to Braddock, had pioneered this route a year earlier when he traveled into the Ohio Country and met Native American leader, Tanacharison (1700-1754).  The expedition gave Washington his first field military experience as well as other American military officers whose numbers profited from this military outing later during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Braddock’s men had to cut a road wide enough to accommodate the wagons and draft animals that accompanied them, as well as the siege artillery that they brought along to use against the new Fort Duquesne established by the French in 1754 at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers.  Progress was painstakingly slow until Braddock split the force into a lead column of about 1,500 men and the rest as a support column to drag artillery and supplies. The flying column made rapid progress, and with each day, the distance between it and the support column increased. This marker is on the (later) National Pike (Route 40) between Elk Park and Farmington, Pennsylvania.

Tour de l’Horloge (1490-97), Évreux, France, and other International Photographs.

PHOTOGRAPHS I FORGOT I HAD: INTERNATIONAL. Sometimes with brief explanations.

Tour de l'Horloge (1490-97) Évreux, France.

Tour de l’Horloge, 1490-97, Évreux, France, November 1, 2002.

Entrance, Chenonceau, 1514-22, France, May 24, 2005. Le Château des Dames.

Gargouille (Gargoyle) or Chimera (Stryga), Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris, July 12, 1979.

Tourists can visit the “gargoyles” on the façade of Notre-Dame in Paris by reaching the passageway to the outdoor balustrade of the tower base. There is a second balustrade at the very top of the tower but it is not open to the general public.

The exuberant Gothic design of the Cathedral, a stone structure that dominates the Île de la Cité in this most ancient part of Paris, was built in stages. A project instigated by the Bishop of Paris, Maurice de Sully (in office, 1160-1196), commenced with the construction of the choir in 1163. The front portals followed around 1200. The next stage included the towers which began their ascent into the Paris skyline in the 1240’s.

Gargouille (Gargoyle), Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris, July 12, 1979.

From the ground level upwards to the top of the cathedral every detail of the building is meticulously construed. One of its world famous and popular attractions is the various gargoyles: birds, humanoids, chimeras, etc., that dot the medieval building. With changing artistic taste, the Gothic period architecture was mostly reviled in Paris after about the year 1400. Accompanying political and cultural events in the nineteenth century–especially the crowning of Napoléon I (1769-1821) as Emperor of France in Notre Dame de Paris in 1804 and the publication of the French Romantic Gothic novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo in 1831–public interest in Gothic design and Notre Dame in particular (which had fallen into great disrepair) was revived. Under French architects Eugène Viollet-le-Duc (1814-1879) and Jean-Baptiste-Antoine Lassus (1807-1857) most of Notre Dame was overhauled in the 1840’s. As with many of its medieval-style treasures, the cathedral’s many gargoyles also underwent some reconstitution but the question remains as to how many precisely were reconstituted and to what specific extent.

Le Prieuré Maurice Denis (Courtyard), Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France. October 31, 2002.

The Collegial Church of St. Gertrude, 11th century, Nivelles, Belgium, March 1, 1992.

Henry Moore, Large Interior Form, 1982. Art Institute of Chicago.

ART OUT OF DOORS. Photographs ©John P. Walsh.

Henry Moore, Large Interior Form, 1982. North Stanley McCormick Memorial Court, Art Institute of Chicago.
Henry Moore, Large Interior Form, 1982. North Stanley McCormick Memorial Court, Art Institute of Chicago. November 5, 2017.

Large Interior Form (1982) by Henry Moore (British, 1898-1986).

“Henry Moore’s towering 16-foot sculpture Large Interior Form is among his more mature works, made when the artist was concerned with the construction of three-dimensional space, internal forms within solid volumes, and placing his work in a natural setting. Early in his career, Moore worked primarily in stone but shifted to modeling and bronze casting once these formal concerns took hold. Large Interior Form plays with mass and void, gravity and growth…and juxtaposes its natural-looking shape with its man-formed substance.” (see http://www.artic.edu/north-stanley-mccormick-memorial-court – retrieved July 9, 2018).