Tag Archives: Irving Penn

Images of Ballet.

Pointe shoes

Pointe shoes.

Marie Rambert (1888-1982) was a prominent dance teacher in British Ballet. She is pictured here in the late 1940’s with students. Rambert founded the Rambert Dance Company which is active today.

In the late 19th century, Ballet developed mainly in Russia. That development included the revival of the male role and rise of the pas de deux.

Ballet Society, New York, 1948. Photo: Irving Penn.

THE DREAM. Choreographer: Frederick Ashton. Music: Felix Mendelssohn. Story: W. Shakespeare.

The Dream is a one-act ballet adapted from Shakespeare created in 1964 for the Royal Ballet. Depicted is elegant Oberon, king of the forest fairies, in a later production.

ONEGIN. Choreographer: John Cranko. Music: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Story: A. Pushkin.

With music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) and first performed in 1965, Onegin is one of the most popular story ballets for audiences to watch and for dancers to aspire to perform in. His ballet masterpiece, Onegin was created by John Cranko (1927-1973). The lead roles of Tatiana and Onegin, and Olga and Lensky, are finely drawn characters who tell a story of love and tragedy through a series of intricate and diverse dance sequences.

MAYERLING. Choreographer: Kenneth MacMillan. Music: Franz Liszt. Story: G. Freeman.

A staple of The Royal Ballet since its premiere in 1978, Mayerling was created by principal choreographer and former artistic director Kenneth MacMillan (1929-1992). It is the tragic story based on a true story of the murder-suicide of the crown prince of Austria-Hungary and his mistress. The music is by Franz Liszt. Appearing in virtually every scene in a three-act ballet, the male lead dancer performs with five different ballerinas. It is one of the most demanding roles of the ballet stage. Mayerling is the Imperial hunting lodge in the Vienna Woods where the bodies of the pair were discovered on January 30, 1889.

Ballerina: Pierina Legnani (1868-1930).

Pierina Legnani (1868-1930) is considered the greatest Italian ballerina of the late nineteenth century. Legnani trained at La Scala Theatre Ballet School in Milan and danced famously in Europe, especially Italy and Russia. In the photograph she is depicted in 1896 at the Imperial Marinsky Theatre in Saint Petersburg, Russia. She is in the lead role in La Perle, an original production created for Legnani.

A production at The Mariinsky Theater of ballet and opera which opened in 1860.

Pierina Legnani and Olga Preobrajenska (1871-1962) in 1899. They were two of the greatest ballerinas in the late nineteenth century.

GISELLE. Choreographer: Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot. Music: Adolphe Adam. Story: Théophile Gautier and Vernoy de Saint-Georges.

Natalya Bessmertnova and Mikhail Lavrovsky dance the roles of Giselle and Albrecht in Adam’s ballet Giselle. With its premiere at the Paris Opera (Salle Le Peletier) in June 1841, the ballet Giselle was a triumph and staged across Europe. The music is composed by Adolphe Adam (1803-1856) and became the French composer’s most popular and enduring work. Musically, Adam introduced the leitmotif, that is, a specific theme for a character who appears on stage in the ballet. The libretto was scored by Théophile Gautier (1811-1872) and Jules-Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges (1799-1875) with choreography by Jean Coralli (1779-1854) and Jules Perrot (1810-1892). The story is about two lovers, Giselle and Albrecht. When Giselle discovers that Albrecht is betrothed to Bathilde she dies of a broken heart at the end of Act I. This leads to the appearance in Act II of a group of otherworldly and potentially mortally dangerous “Wilis,” a type of young female vampire, intent on revenge for Giselle by arranging for Albrecht’s destruction.

Paris Opera (Salle Le Peletier) in 1844 by A. Provost. The print depects the theatre at the time of Adolphe Adam’s triumphant ballet Giselle. The opera building, opened in 1820, was destroyed by fire in 1873 and replaced in a new location by the Palais Garnier.

Opera Le Peletier salle in 1858 by Gustave Janet (1829-1898).

Street ballet.

COPPÉLIA. Choreographer: Arthur Saint-Léon. Music: Léo Delibes. Story: Charles-Louis-Étienne Nuitter.

Coppélia is based on Der Sandmann by E.T.A. Hoffmann (1776-1822). The comic ballet was choreographed by Arthur Saint-Léon (1821-1870) to the music of Léo Delibes (1836-1891). The libretto is by Charles-Louis-Étienne Nuitter (1828-1899). The comedy about mischief-making village folk premiered in May 1870 and, though it later went on to become one of the most popular works of the Paris Opera Ballet, was immediately interrupted by the Franco-Prussian War and siege of Paris. Italian ballerina Giuseppina Bozzaccchi (1853-1870) first danced the part of Swanilda. Tragically, the 17-year-old ballerina died from malnutrition related to the war’s privations in November 1870. In this photograph from a 2014 production by the English National Ballet, Shioro Kase dances as Swanilda and Yonah Acosta dances as Franz.

PAQUITA. Choreographer: Joseph Mazilier. Music: Edouard Deldevez. Story: Joseph Mazilier and Paul Foucher.

Natalia Osipova dances as Paquita at the Royal Opera House, London. The two-act ballet is set in Spain during the Napoleonic Wars. It tells the love story of a French military officer and a Spanish gypsy woman.

Ballerina: Marie Taglioni (1804-1884).

Marie Taglioni had many spectacular ballet accomplishments in her dancing career that spanned 25 years. Marie’s parents were both dancers. Her Swedish mother was a ballet dancer and her Italian father was a dancer, choreographer, and ballet master in Vienna at the Court Opera. Marie was rigorously trained by her father in Vienna– six hours each day of ballet practice for six days a week. The hard work paid off. At 17 years old, Marie made her debut in Vienna in Rossini’s La reception d’une jeune nymphe à la cour de Terpischore, choreographed by her father. Over the next 5 years Marie danced in cities in Austria and Germany until, in 1827, she made her Paris Opéra debut. In 1832 Marie is credited with dancing en pointe (on tip toes), an innovation for ballet theater at that time. As a famous celebrity, Marie Taglioni influenced fashion and hairstyles in the 1830’s.

Marie Taglioni as Flore in Charles Didelot’s ballet Zephire et Flore. Hand-colored lithograph, c. 1831 by Alfred Chalon (1780-1860). The first famous ballerina, Marie Taglioni influenced hairstyles and fashion in the Romantic Era of the 1830’s and was the first ballet dancer to move en pointe.

Marie married in 1832 but was separated in 1836. She bore a child with a lover in 1836 but he died soon after. In 1837 Marie accepted a dance contract to perform in Russia at the famed Imperial Ballet in St. Petersburg. Marie remained at the Imperial Ballet until 1842, the same year she gave birth to a second child. In 1843 she danced in Milan at La Scala in another of her father’s ballet creations, La Sylphide and in 1845 appeared in London at Her Majesty’s Theatre dancing in Pas de quatre choreographed by Jules Perrot (1810-1892). In London, Taglioni was one of the famous ballerinas to appear in this production dancing alongside Carlotta Grisi (1819-1899), Lucile Grahn (1819-1907) and Fanny Cerrito (1817-1909).

Dominating the image is Marie Taglioni, standing with her arms en couronne, surrounded by ballerinas Lucille Grahn, Fanny Cerrito, and Carlotta Grisi for the 1845 London production of Pas de Quatre. Lithograph by English artist and engraver Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895).

In 1847 Marie Taglioni retired from the stage following her appearance in The Judgment of Paris, a ballet that concludes an opera (1754) by Christoph Gluck. She lived in Venice into the 1850’s. Marie Taglioni returned to Paris in 1857 to take up the position of dance examiner at the Paris Opéra. One day before her 80th birthday, she died in Marseilles. For posterity there is some mystery as to the exact location of her grave for it is not known into which cemetery in Paris Marie Taglioni was exactly buried.

To be continued.

Grace Kelly in Photographs: Philadelphia, New York and Hollywood.

Text by John P. Walsh.

Here are some famous and rarely seen photographs of Philadelphia-born Grace Kelly (1929-1982) before and during her short but dazzling film career in Hollywood. Called the “Greatest Screen Presence in Film,”1 passionate and dramatically talented Grace Kelly was Alfred Hitchcock’s favorite actress when she starred in three of his classic films of the 1950’s: Dial M For Murder (1954), Rear Window (1954) and To Catch a Thief (1955).  After Grace was discovered in 1951 by Gary Cooper who said that she was “different from all these actresses we’ve been seeing so much of”2—and subsequently cast in High Noon (1951) as Cooper’s movie wife—Grace Kelly’s incomparable charm and allure swiftly impressed Hollywood and the world. From September 1951 to March 1956 Grace Kelly’s star blazed in eleven major motion pictures for five different Hollywood studios. Following High Noon for United Artists, her performance for M-G-M on John Ford’s Mogambo (1953) led to Grace’s first Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress. Grace began work in July 1953 on Dial M For Murder for Warner Brothers where she met Alfred Hitchcock who became a cinematic mentor. Soon after, The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954) at Paramount Pictures began Grace’s ground-breaking multi-film collaboration with Academy-Award winning costume designer Edith Head. Grace refused other lucrative film offers to work again with Hitchcock, this time at Paramount Pictures, on Rear Window co-starring Jimmy Stewart. In this landmark film which came out in summer 1954, one of Hitchcock’s dramatic emphases for Grace Kelly’s film persona was to display her natural elegance and sex appeal—he was amused by her public image as an “Ice Queen”3—by having her costumed in an array of fabulous Edith-Head-designed lingerie, dresses, and pants. Growing up in Philadelphia Grace Kelly as an adolescent and teenager had modeled in local fashion shows but, by the middle 1950’s in her mid-twenties, she became an international fashion and style icon. Following these first phenomenal film credits, what happened for Grace Kelly next was perhaps surprising but not unexpected, and a clear and certain capstone to, and beacon for, her professional acting career that was barely five years old. Never just a pretty face, Grace Kelly insisted in her studio contract that she be allowed regular breaks to be able to act in live theater.4 Grace admired the art of the live stage and welcomed demanding theater and film roles that challenged and exhibited her acting range and abilities. This was part of her motivation to go after the hardly glamorous but dramatically impressive role of Georgie Elgin in George Seaton’s The Country Girl (1954) for Paramount Pictures. With co-stars Bing Crosby and William Holden, the film featured Grace playing the long-suffering wife of an alcoholic actor struggling to resume his career (played by Crosby). At its release, the film was a hit and nominated for seven Academy Awards. On Wednesday, March 30, 1955, at the telecast of the 27th annual Academy Awards held at RKO Pantages Theatre,5 The Country Girl won two Oscars, including one for Grace Kelly for Best Actress. At just 25 years old Grace Kelly—of the ambitious and hugely competitive Philadelphia Kellys—had reached the highest echelons of the cinematic arts by way of her profession’s gold-plated statuette. Always looking ahead, Grace’s film career had already turned international. She did Mogambo for a host of reasons not least of which was being able to see Africa with “all expenses paid.”6 In early 1954 she had flown to South America to make Green Fire (1954) for M-G-M with Stewart Granger and then in May 1954 she was at the French Riviera to make her third film with Alfred Hitchcock: To Catch a Thief (1955) co-starring Cary Grant for Paramount Pictures.  Grace liked the Riviera enough to travel there one year later, in April 1955, this time for the 8th annual Cannes Film Festival. To what degree Grace could imagine in advance how that particular journey to that most beautiful part of the world would impact her film career as well as future life as wife and mother was beyond her. It was during that early spring 1955 Mediterranean trip that Grace Kelly was first introduced to Prince Rainier III of Monaco.

Grace Kelly stood five foot seven inches tall and weighed 118 pounds. Her dress size was two.7 She was born on November 12, 1929 into the Kelly family of Philadelphia. Grace Patricia Kelly was the third of four children and one of that Irish-German family’s three girls. Elder sister Peggy and younger sister Lizanne were athletic and shared their mother Margaret’s model looks. Margaret was also the family disciplinarian who the Kelly children liked to call “the Prussian General.”8 As a child Grace was dreamy and shy while her siblings were outgoing and athletic. Yet Grace too inherited a keen awareness of her body using her arms and legs to be dramatically expressive in an actress’s rather than athlete’s way.9 By the time she was 18 years old Grace’s beautiful rectangle-shaped face with soft pear-shape dimensions displayed thick blond hair, almond-shaped blue eyes, a small high-bridge nose and ruby lips. Each member of the Philadelphia Kelly family was an exuberant competitor in areas of American life such as athletics, business, politics, or high society.  As an adult one of Grace’s major strengths in addition to her incredible beauty was her ability to focus on whatever goal she decided to pursue whether professionally or personally until that goal was achieved. When Grace won the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1955 it was also a brick in the Kelly wall of ambition for success.  Before she was a teenager Grace performed in plays so that in her teenage years a desire to be an actress grew. Since Grace was situated within a protective and affluent family as well as educated in Philadelphia Catholic and private schools she sought theater work in New York City instead of Hollywood which Grace, even after she achieved film success, considered a pitiless machine of cinematic production.10

It was Aristotle Onassis who suggested to Prince Rainier that he marry a beautiful American movie star to bring the glitterati back to Monaco. Onassis’s list at the time did not include Grace Kelly.11 Invited to the 1955 Cannes Film Festival after she had won the Academy Award for Best Actress for The Country Girl one month before, Grace was curious enough about the prince to be introduced to him in Monaco on Friday, May 6, 1955. What is memorable from the photographs of their meeting at the palace is that the Prince looks chic and handsome and Grace is at her most beautiful in a black silk floral print dress with her blond hair pulled back into a German-style bun. That evening she returned to Cannes for the festival’s screening of The Country Girl helping to conclude a day that Grace herself called “pretty wild.”12 But Grace’s career in Hollywood wasn’t over—nor her life half begun. She was back in Paris before the festival’s winners were announced (she had won nothing there),13 and soon returned to Hollywood to make what turned out to be her final two Hollywood movies – The Swan and High Society.

TEXT NOTES:

  1. It was actually my brother Kevin, now deceased, who when he was working in the Chicago Film Office wrote to me this apt description of Grace Kelly (and Rear Window as the greatest film ever).
  2. Quoted in Roberts, Paul G., Style Icons Vol 4 Sirens, Fashion Industry Broadcast, p. 74.
  3. Dherbier, Yann-Brice and Verlhac, Pierre-Henry, Grace Kelly A Life in Pictures, Pavilion, 2006, p. 11.
  4. Edith-Head-designed apparel for Rear Window – Haugland, H. Kristina, Grace Kelly: Icon of style to Royal bride (Philadelphia Museum of Art), Yale University Press, 2006, p. 956; so she could act in live theater – TBA
  5. Date and place of 1955 Oscars- see https://www.oscars.org/oscars/ceremonies/1955 – retrieved April 26, 2017.
  6. did Mogambo for an all-expense paid visit to Kenya – TBA
  7. height and dress size- http://www.bodymeasurements.org/grace-kelly/ – retrieved April 28, 2017.
  8. Dherbier and Verlhac, p. 9.
  9. Conant, Howell, Grace: An intimate portrait of Princess Grace by her friend and favorite photographer, Random House, 1992, p.18.
  10. Preferred theater to film-TBA
  11. Leigh, Wendy, True Grace: The Life and Times of an American Princess, New York: Thomas Dunne Books, 2007, p.100.
  12. ibid., p. 112.
  13. Dherbier and Verlhac, p. 12.

©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by an means, electronic  or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

THE PHOTOGRAPHS:

Grace Kelly, December 29, 1954.
Grace Kelly portrait from the film “Rear Window” photographed by Virgil Apger, 1954.
Grace Kelly in red by Howell Conant, 1955.

LADY IN RED: Grace Kelly by Howell Conant, 1955. For more than 25 years Conant was Grace Kelly’s friend and favorite photographer.

Grace Kelly MGM portrait
Grace Kelly
1954 philippe halsman
Grace Kelly, 1954 PHILIPPE HALSMAN
Grace Kelly 1954  Photo Cecil Beaton
Grace 1954
Grace 1955
GK naked shoulders
GK 1954 Apger

 

 

Grace Kelly by Apger Virgil, c. 1954. In 1929—the year Grace was born—Apger was hired in the portrait gallery at Paramount. In 1931 he went to work at M-G-M doing what he did at Paramount: developing negatives, working with the dryers, and making prints. Apger was an assistant to Clarence Sinclair Bull, but Jean Harlow gave Apger his start as a production still photographer on China Seas in 1935. After that, Apger shot M-G-M publicity stills for the stars.

 

Grace Kelly in Fourteen Hours (1951).

 

Grace Kelly The Country Girl

Grace Kelly Headshot for The Country Girl (1954). 

 

FIXED Mogambo 001

Grace Kelly had many reasons to do John Ford’s Mogambo which started filming in Africa in November 1952. Two of those reasons were to co-star with legendary Clark Gable and sultry Ava Gardner at the height of her fame.

Grace Kelly and Clark Gable Mogambo

publicity still The Bridges at Toko-ri

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Photographer Howell Conant observed that every movement of Grace’s body was a telling gesture. Jamaica, 1955.
Grace Kelly and Cary Grant
studio publicity, To catch a thief 1954 001FIXED
Grace Kelly and Cary Grant in To Catch a Thief.
La Victorine studios 1954 Hitch directs GK on To Catch a Thief grace kelly
Grace and Edith Head To Catch A Thief
GK arrives with Edith Head to the 1955 academy awards in the Ed 001
Grace Kelly arrives with Edith Head at the 1955 Academy Awards wearing the ice blue gown that Edith designed for her.
gk with oscar

Grace Kelly backstage after the 27th annual Academy Awards on March 25, 1955 when she won the Oscar for Best Actress for her role in The Country Girl.

1955 Academy Award
Grace Kelly with her Oscar for Best Actress in hand backstage at the 1955 Academy Awards.
27th Annual Academy Awards Grace Kelly and Bob Hope
27th Annual Academy Awards Bette Davis presenter, Marlon Brando and Grace Kelly


The 27th Annual Academy Awards, Bette Davis presenter, Marlon Brando and Grace Kelly, with their Best Actor and Best Actress Oscars. 

grace-kelly-posing-for-e2809clifee2809d-magazine-1954-philippe-halsmanmagnum-photos
Edith head rear window

Edith Head’s wardrobe for Grace Kelly in Rear Window (1954). Chic and modern, Grace’s memorable film entrance is in this black-fitted bodice with off-the-shoulder V-neckline on top of a full bunched and layered chiffron tulle skirt to mid calf marked by a pattern at the hip. Grace’s high fashion is cinched by a thin black patent leather belt and elbow-length white gloves.

wardrobe by Edith Head for Rear Window

In the 1930’s Edith Head leaned liberal in her costume designs. But in the 1950’s her designs became more conservative. Grace Kelly for Rear Window.

FIXED rear window 001
For Rear Window released in the summer of 1954 Grace Kelly received equal billings with co-star Jimmy Stewart and director Alfred Hitchcock.
famous eau de nil suit work in Rear window

Edith Head’s famous eau de nil suit and matching hat for Grace Kelly in Rear Window (1954).

NEW FIXED The Bridges at Toko-Ri is a 1954
In Bridges at Toko-Ri (1955) Grace is radiant in each scene she’s in. She plays Nancy Brubaker, the wife of Navy pilot William Holden who is killed in action in the Korean War. A story of an American family in war-time, the film’s cooperation with the U.S. Navy led to realistic aerial and carrier action scenes that won it the Academy Award for Best Special Effects in 1956.

Grace Kelly in wardrobe by Edith Head for The Bridges of Toko-Ri. Filming began in January 1954 where Grace played a small but pivotal role as Nancy Brubaker, wife of Lt. Harry Brubaker (William Holden). By this time Grace was becoming as well-known as Audrey Hepburn for her fashion sense, and Edith Head found it a joy to work with her.

Paramount Publicity
Grace Kelly was Hitchcock's Muse
Grace Kelly.
1955 portrait during her Hollywood years
GK
Grace Kelly in almost complete profile, 1954.
Kellys 1945
The Kelly siblings in Philadelphia. Grace and Peggy flank Jack with Lizanne on his shoulders, c. 1946.
grace 1947
Grace Kelly (center) with school chums. Grace had already started amateur modeling and acting by this time.
kellys 1935
Kelly family in Philadelphia, 1935. From left: son Jack and father Jack, Lizanne, mother Margaret. Back: Grace and Peggy.
Mrs. Kelly with Grace and sisters Lizanne and Peggy
Grace Kelly Ocean City NJ

Grace on on a family vacation at Ocean City, New Jersey, c. 1946.

Grace in NYC late 1940s

Grace Kelly in New York City as a young model and actress, late 1940’s.

GK 1951

Grace moved to Southern California to be in motion pictures. She appeared in her first film called Fourteen Hours for 20th Century-Fox in 1951 when she was 22 years old.

GK 1950s
Grace takes a comb to her hair, early 1950’s.
Headshot late 1940s
Marcus Blechman 1952 001
Portrait of Grace Kelly by theater and film photographer Marcus Blechman (1922-2010).
Grace Kelly in a promotional photo for High Noon (1952)
Grace and Dorothy Towne High Noon

Grace Kelly and her stand-in Dorothy Towne on the set of High Noon.

Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado, Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly High Noon

Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado, Gary Cooper, and Grace Kelly in High Noon. Gary Cooper took credit for discovering Grace for the movies. He said about Grace: she was “different from all these actresses we’ve been seeing so much of.”

FINAL jack kelley & grace 1937 001
FINAl GK HALSMAN 1954 001
Grace Kelly in 1954 in Philippe Halsman’s “Jump” series which featured celebrities jumping for the camera.
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Grace Kelly eating cotton candy on the 4th of July 1955 in Philadelphia.
warddrobe tests GK The country Girl -
Grace Kelly in wardrobe tests for The Country Girl. Edith Head dressed Grace’s character of Georgie Elgin in brown wool clothes, cardigan sweaters and low-heel Capezio shoes.
FINAL grace country girl 001
At the end of The Country Girl, Georgie Elgin is dressed by Edith Head in a dark dress with a low V-cut neckline and jeweled accent at the waist and in a strand of pearls. It allowed the movie audience to see how lovely Georgie Elgin really was.
Grace Kelly in 1956.

Grace Kelly, Jamaica, 1955. After making six films in 1954, Grace went on vacation with her sister Peggy and took along Howell Conant to be official photographer. Grace would return to Jamaica for family vacations as Princess of Monaco.

GK 1954 with sister mrs peggy
Grace in 1954 on Corsica with her sister Peggy and Oliver the dog.
GK with MOm
Grace Kelly modeling a fashionable dress for her mother in the mid 1950’s. Look at Grace’s reflection in the mirror.
GK MH GREENE 001
Grace Kelly in New York City by Milton H. Greene, 1955.
Portrait of Grace Kelly by Alfonso Sharland
GK 1955
Grace Kelly, 1955.
GK 1954 G Lester
Grace Kelly is dressed for St. Patrick’s Day in 1954. She has a copy of the MGM studio news on her lap. Photograph by Gene Lester.
HITCH &GK
Coffee or tea? Grace Kelly sitting in Cary Grant’s chair and Alfred Hitchcock on the set of To Catch A Thief.
Grace Kelly in Ball Gown To Catch A Thief
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Grace Kelly and Edith Head working on costume designs. The pair had a close working relationship and remained good friends. After Grace left Hollywood, Edith traveled to Monaco many times to visit her.
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26-year-old Grace Kelly and 31-year-old Prince Rainier III at their first meeting at the palace in Monaco, May 6, 1955. They would be engaged to be married by the end of the year. Photograph by Edward Quinn.
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Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier III on May 6, 1955 in Monaco. He told her, “This is Europe, not America. We think differently here, and you will have to get used to it.”

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First Visit: Grace Kelly in Monaco, May 6, 1955.

Grace Kelly Rear Window

 

Grace Kelly in Rear Window (1954)  slow motion kiss close-up.

 

James Stewart & Grace in Rear Window

James Stewart and Grace Kelly in Rear Window.

Publicity Rear window

Grace Kelly and Jimmy Stewart in a Paramount publicity photograph for Rear Window. (1954).

Grace on the set of Rear Window

Grace on the set of Rear Window.

Grace Kelly at Paramount

Grace at Paramount.

Grace Kelly in Rear window

 Grace Kelly wearing the outfit for the final scene of Rear Window.

Grace Kelly January 1956 High Society

Grace Kelly in an outfit by Helen Rose for the film High Society in January 1956. 

Grace Kelly behind the wheel of a Mercedes-Benz during the filming of High Society (1956) in a scene with Frank Sinatra.

Grace Kelly MGM publicity photograph

Grace Kelly in a MGM publicity photograph.

Grace Kelly MGM publicity photo The Swan

Grace Kelly in a MGM publicity photograph for The Swan.

The Swan Grace Kelly

Grace Kelly, The Swan.

Grace Kelly by Bud Fraker

 Grace Kelly in a Paramount publicity photo by Bud Fraker.

 

Grace Kelly in earrings by Joseff

Grace Kelly in earrings by Joseff.

Grace Kelly make up test High Society 1956

Grace Kelly in a make-up test for the honeymoon scene in High Society.

Grace Kelly High Society 1956

Grace Kelly in High Society (1956).

Spring 1956 bridal show in New York City
A spring 1956 bridal show at the Ambassador Hotel in New York City featured a Cartier replica of Grace’s engagement ring on the center model. The other rings replicate Rita Gam’s and Margaret Truman’s. 
Grace Kelly Rear Window

Grace as Lisa in Rear window.

Oscars 1955, Grace Kelly with Best Actress Academy Award as emcee Bob Hope looks on.

Grace Kelly in a chiffon-draped gown by Edith Head for To Catch a Thief (1955).

Grace Kelly studying the script during filming of George Seaton’s The Country Girl. The 1954 film received 7 Academy Award nominations and won two. One of them was for Grace who won the Oscar for Best Actress.

Next  in CORRIDORS: Grace Kelly, Famous and Rare Photographs. Part II: Hollywood ends, Monaco begins (1956-1982).