Monthly Archives: October 2019

Quotes: John Henry Newman.

John Henry Newman (1801-1890) was a theologian and poet who was first an Anglican priest and later a Roman Catholic priest and cardinal. In the 1830’s and until his conversion to Catholicism in 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement. They were a group of Anglicans who looked to create a bridge between the Church of England and the Catholic Church by adopting many Catholic beliefs and liturgical rituals from before the English Reformation. Newman eventually came to believe for himself that these religious efforts proved insufficient and he left the Anglican Communion for the Catholic Church in 1845. Already an articulate and influential religious leader in Britain, Newman’s decision brought with it the burden of having upset his friends as well as being challenged by them and others for his changed religious opinions on polemical grounds. Newman, a longtime writer and speaker, responded after a while with his now-celebrated Apologia Pro Vita Sua (1865–1866), which served as a defense of his religious opinions after he quit his position as Anglican vicar at Oxford. Newman, a 19th-century master of English prose and poetry, had already published The Idea of a University (1852) and went on to publish Grammar of Assent (1870) as well as several poems, some of which were set to music or served as hymns. In 1879, at the age of 78 years old, Pope Leo XIII named Newman a cardinal for his work on behalf of the Catholic Church in England as well as his having co-founded the Catholic University of Ireland in 1854, which today as University College Dublin is Ireland’s largest institution of higher learning. On October 13, 2019, John Henry Newman was canonized a Catholic saint at the Vatican by Pope Francis. St. John Henry Newman became the first saint canonized from Britain since 1976. In remarks by Prince Charles who led the British delegation to the Vatican for Newman’s canonization, the Prince of Wales said: “In the age in which he [Newman] attains sainthood, his example is needed more than ever – for the manner in which, at his best, he could advocate without accusation, could disagree without disrespect and, perhaps most of all, could see differences as places of encounter rather than exclusion.” London-born Cardinal Newman died in England in 1890 at 89 years old. He founded the Oratory at Birmingham in 1848 and through his writings spoke to many about the issues of faith, education, and conscience.

“A given opinion, as held by several individuals, even when of the most congenial views, is as distinct as are their faces.” Oxford University sermons, 1843.

“It is as absurd to argue men, as to torture them, into believing.” Oxford University sermon, December 11, 1831.

“From the age of fifteen, dogma has been the fundamental principle of my religion: I know of no other religion; I cannot enter into the idea of any other sort of religion; religion, as a mere sentiment, is to me a dream and a mockery.” Apologia Pro Vita Sua, 1864.

“I used to wish the Arabian Tales were true; my imagination ran on unknown influences, on magical powers, and talismans. I thought life might be a dream, or I an Angel, and all this world a deception, my fellow-angels by a playful device concealing themselves from me, and deceiving me from the semblance of a material world.” Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

“I was brought up from a child to take great delight in reading the Bible; but I had formed no religious convictions till I was fifteen. Of course I had perfect knowledge of my Catechism.” Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

“I read Joseph Milner’s Church History, and was nothing short of enamoured of the long extracts from St. Augustine and the other Fathers which I found there. I read them as being the religion of the primitive Christians.” Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

“I read Newton on the Prophecies, and in consequence became most firmly convinced that the Pope was the Antichrist predicted by Daniel, St. Paul and St. John. My imagination was stained by the effects of this doctrine up to the year 1843.” Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

“There are virtues indeed, which the world is not fitted to judge about or to uphold, such as faith, hope and charity; but it can judge about Truthfulness; it can judge about the natural virtues, and truthfulness is one of them. Natural virtues may also become supernatural; Truthfulness is such…” Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

“Catholics on the other hand shade and soften the awful antagonism between good and evil, which is one of their dogmas, by holding that there are different degrees of justification, that there is a great difference in point of gravity between sin and sin, that there is a possibility and the danger of falling away, and that there is no certain knowledge given to anyone that he is simply in a state of grace, and much less that he is to persevere to the end.” Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

“Ex Umbris et Imaginibus in Veritatem! (From shadows and symbols into the truth!)

“Lead, kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom; Lead thou me on! The night is dark, and I am far from home; Lead thou me on! Keep thou my feet: I do not ask to see the distant scene; one step enough for me.” The Pillar of the Cloud, 1833.

Marilyn Monroe in Photographs: The Modeling Years (1946-1962).

It has been said that Marilyn Monroe is the most beautiful woman in the world– of her time, and ours. For this iconic mid-20th century sex symbol there continues to be an almost insatiable demand for her many photographic and other images through a career in the public eye of around 15 years. From the beginning, in nearly every photographic image, Norma Jeane Baker (or Mortenson)/Marilyn Monroe exuded an irresistible natural beauty and sexiness. Marilyn was the girl next door and glamour’s Queen. The world recognized that she had a special and seemingly irreplaceable affinity for the camera as a model, celebrity, and movie star. Marilyn’s ability to communicate her radiance by way of the photographic image lifted her personal and physical qualities into a universal language and appeal. After 19-year-old Norma Jeane was discovered during World War II working in a factory on behalf of the war effort until Marilyn Monroe’s tragic and untimely death in August 1962 at 36 years old, the myth of Marilyn Monroe is defined through the lens of the still camera as much as her star qualities and trajectory as an actress in motion pictures. These images from Marilyn Monroe’s lifetime of modeling in front of the still camera hopefully works to tell the story of a special love affair between model, photographer and lens that is Marilyn’s special gift to the world.

Norma Jeane in 1945.

Norma Jeane portrait. Photographer unknown.

Norma Jeane in portrait by Richard C. Miller.

Norma Jeane. Photograph by Richard C. Miller.

Amateur model. Photo of Norma Jeane by David Conover, c. 1946.

Marilyn sweater girl. Photograph by David Conover.

Norma Jeane among the foliage. Photograph by Andre De Dienes.

Marilyn, the girl next door. Photo by Andre De Dienes.

Norma Jeane draws in the sand. Photograph by Andre De Dienes.

Norma Jeane. Photograph by Richard C. Miller.

Norma Jeane/Marilyn Monroe in 1946. Photograph by Richard C. Miller.

Marilyn Monroe in her first modeling job. Industry show hostess.

Norma Jeane in gloves. Photograph by Edwin Steinmeyer.

Glamour photograph of Marilyn Monroe by Edwin Steinmeyer.

Marilyn in 1946. Unknown photographer.

Marilyn’s image is featured in an advertisement for Nesbitt’s orange drink in 1946.

Marilyn in color publicity photograph by John Michle.

Marilyn becomes a bleach blonde for the first time. Photo: H. Maier Studio.

Marilyn in her first cheesecake shot. Photo by Earl Moran.

Marilyn’s “girl next door” image transformed. Photo: Earl Moran.

Marilyn in a photograph with artist Earl Moran. Photo: Joseph Jasgur.

Marilyn poolside. Unknown photographer.

Marilyn in a red bathing suit.

Marilyn in a red-striped bikini.

Marilyn in a head shot, c. 1947.

Marilyn Monroe in publicity shot, 1949. Photo: László Willinger.

Marilyn in a gorgeous publicity shot.

Marilyn in a publicity head shot.

Marilyn golfing. Unknown photographer.

Marilyn in t-shirt and rolled up jeans atop a shiny Cadillac in 1946. Photo: Richard Whiteman.

Norma Jeane at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. Photo: Joseph Jasgur.

Marilyn in floral bikini. Fox Studio publicity photograph.

Marilyn with Ruffles the dog. Fox Studio publicity photograph.

Marilyn in an early Fox Studio publicity photograph.

Marilyn modeling in a fashion show. Photo: Larry Kronquist.

Marilyn in 1950. Photo: J.R. Eyerman.

Favorite model at the Pacific Coast Antiques Show.

Marilyn Monroe in Life, 1950. Photo: Ed Clark.

Marilyn, California coast, April 1951.

Cover girl Marilyn Monroe, Look, September 9, 1952.

Classic Marilyn Monroe, Life, April 7, 1952. The talk of Hollywood.

Marilyn in New York, 1952. Photo: Eve Arnold.

Marilyn in a park with a book of Irish literature, 1952. Photo: Eve Arnold.

Modern Screen, December 1952. Photo by Fox Studio publicity.

Marilyn Monroe for Modern Screen, 1952. Photo: Gene Kornman, Fox Studio.

Marilyn Monroe at the Hollywood Bowl with photographer Bruno Bernard, July 1953. Photographers loved that the camera loved her — and that Marilyn loved the camera back.

Marilyn in Beverly Hills, Fall 1954. Photo: Ted Baron.

Marilyn, 1957. Photo: Milton H. Greene.

Marilyn, Stars & Stripes, 1950. Marilyn was popular with the american troops fighting in Korea so much so that they named a mountain peak there after her.

Marilyn in a Fox publicity photo.

Marilyn, aspiring starlet.