Monthly Archives: April 2020

Quotations: Archbishop Derek Worlock (1920-1990). (1 Quote).

Derek Worlock (February 4, 1920 – February 6. 1996) was an English priest in the Roman Catholic Church and the Archbishop of Liverpool.

Worlock was committed to collaboration with all his fellow Christians. Worlock co-authored the books Better Together and With Hope in our Hearts (1995) with the Anglican Bishop of Liverpool, David Sheppard. Worklock’s motto was Caritas Christi eluceat (“For the Shining Light of Christ”).

In 1994 Archbishop Worlock was awarded the Freedom of the City of Liverpool award and appointed as a Companion of Honour in 1996. At his death that year, a memorial for him was planned. It was commissioned in 2005 and made possible through public donations. It was designed by British sculptor Stephen Broadbent (b. 1961). The memorial is situated at the halfway point of Liverpool’s Hope Street. Hope Street joins both the Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals. See it here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/newfolder/2535308455

The aim of the statue was to create a lasting memorial to the work of the two religious leaders—Catholic archbishop Worklock and Anglican Bishop David Sheppard— who aimed to heal their churches’ deep religious divisions and serve as a unifying force in Liverpool.

I am my brother’s keeper, and he’s sleeping pretty rough these days. London OBSERVER, December 16, 1990. (On the homeless).

Sheppard-Worlock Statue by Stephen Broadbent. Above: Catholic Archbishop Derek Worlock. Commissioned in 2005 and paid for with public donations, the statue sits halfway between the Catholic and Anglican cathedrals that are both situated on Hope Street in Liverpool. The statue memorializes the two religious leaders who worked together as a unifying force to heal religious divisions among their churches and in the city. Below: Anglican bishop David Sheppard.

Coat of Arms, Most Rev. Derek Worlock, Metropolitan Archbishop of Liverpool. It contains Worklock’s motto: Caritas Christi eluceat (“For the Shining Light of Christ”).

PHOTO SOURCES:
File: Detail full length Sheppard-Worlock Statue 2017-2.jpg
CreatorRodhullandemu
License CC BY-SA 4.0
Source WikiCommons.

File: Detail from the statue of Derek Worlock, the former Catholic Archbishop of Liverpool 2.jpg
Created: 18 September 2008
CC BY-SA 2.0


File: Detail from the Sheppard-Worlock statue Liverpool. Anglican Bishop David Sheppard. Man vyi – Self-photographed. Own work, all rights released (Public domain)/

File: Coat of arms
Attribution 3.0 Unported license. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons. You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the work. Under the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Uk_rc_liverpool_worlock.png

Signs. (40 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

Villa Park, Illinois, May 2018.

Lisle, Illinois, 2018.

Chicago, 2018.

April 2020.

April 2020.

April 2020.

Chicago, 2015.

April 2020.

The Wilmette Theatre, 1122 Central Ave., in downtown Wilmette, Illinois, 2016. The theater was built in 1914, and originally called the Central Theatre. Owned by Encyclopedia Britannica Films since 1950, the vintage movie house had been shuttered when Richard S. Stern bought and re-opened it in 1966. Stern came from a family of movie theater owners. His father, Henry Stern, opened what is credited as the first art film theater house in Chicago–the Cinema Theater at Michigan and Chicago Avenues opened in 1929. After it was demolished in 1981, a skyscraper and high-end retail store were built on the site. In 1966, Richard Stern asked his father for a loan, and bought the property. Decades later, after renovating the Wilmette Theater into a two-screen operation, Richard Stern decided to sell it. In 2006, Stern sold the Wilmette Theatre to a small group of community investors interested in the movie theatre’s unique history and continuing to operate it showing top-quality first run and art films. The lobby portion of the building retains much of its vintage charm.

Sources: https://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/wilmette/ct-wml-richard-stern-obit-story-tl-1029-20151027-story.html; http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/980;http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/7675

The Tivoli Theatre (1928), Downers Grove, Illinois, 2016. 1,000+-seat movie theater designed by Van Gurten & Van Gurten architects. Opened Christmas Day, 1928. It is the second in the U.S. fitted for sound movies. The first was the 1200-seat Brooklyn Paramount Theater in New York City that opened in November 1928 and closed in the early 1960’s.

Chicago, 2014.

Macy’s on State Street, Chicago, 2018.

Ten Commandments, Chicago Loop Synagogue (1958), 2015.

The Nutcracker by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, December 2017. The 3,900-seat Auditorium Theatre (1889) in Chicago was designed by Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan.

April 2020.

Chicago, 2015.

April 2020.

The Braddock Road, PA, March 2010.

The Braddock Road was a military road built in 1755 in what was then British America and is now the United States. It was the first improved road to cross the barrier of the ridge lines of the Appalachians. It was constructed by about 2,500 troops of the Virginia militia and British regulars commanded by General Edward Braddock (1695-1755), part of the expedition to conquer the Ohio Country from the French at the beginning of the French and Indian War (1756-63). George Washington, who was aide-de-camp to Braddock, had pioneered this route a year earlier when he traveled into the Ohio Country and met Native American leader, Tanacharison (1700-1754).  The expedition gave Washington his first field military experience as well as other American military officers whose numbers profited from this military outing later during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Braddock’s men had to cut a road wide enough to accommodate the wagons and draft animals that accompanied them, as well as the siege artillery that they brought along to use against the new Fort Duquesne established by the French in 1754 at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers.  Progress was painstakingly slow until Braddock split the force into a lead column of about 1,500 men and the rest as a support column to drag artillery and supplies. The flying column made rapid progress, and with each day, the distance between it and the support column increased. This marker is on the (later) National Pike (Route 40) between Elk Park and Farmington, Pennsylvania.

April 2020.

April 2020. Postponed to 2021.

CTA stop, Oak Park, Illinois, January 2018.

June 2020.

Forest Park, Illinois. July 2016.

Chicago, September 2015.

Chicago, July 2015.

Chinatown, Chicago, August 2015.

Chicago, September 2015.

Chicago, June 2018.

Fried Green Tomato Fest, Aug 26, Watseka, Illinois, August 2017.

Wicked at the Ford Center for the Performing Arts, 24 W. Randolph Street, Chicago, Illinois, December 2017. The Oriental Theater, now the James M. Nederlander Theatre, opened in 1926. It is one of the many ornate movie palaces built in Chicago by the architectural firm of Rapp and Rapp.

The venue presented both movies and vaudeville acts in its first years. When talkies arrived, the Oriental Theatre became predominantly a movie house in the 1930s. Live stage, theatrical, and concert performances continued for Chicago audiences in a venue that currently seats over 2,000 people.

Duke Ellington and his orchestra made frequent appearances at the Nederlander/Oriental Theatre which was built in the exotic ornate style. Some of the legendary stars who were seen at the Nederlander/Oriental Theatre were Judy Garland, George jessel, Fanny Brice, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Cab Calloway, Eddie Cantor, Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Jean Harlow, Billie Holiday, Bob Hope, Al Jolson, Danny Kaye, Jerry Lewis, The Marx Brothers, The Three Stooges, Frank Sinatra, Sophie Tucker, Sarah Vaughan, Henny Youngman, and many more.

The theatre underwent a multi-million dollar restoration in the mid 1990s and reopened in 1998.  From June 2005 through January 2009, the theater housed a full production of Wicked, making it the most popular stage production in Chicago history. In December 2017 a traveling national tour of Wicked had just started its Chicago run.

Murphy’s Food King, Kentland, Indiana, August 2017.

Chicago (Uptown), August 7, 2015.

Wow Bao-Theater District, Chicago (1 W. Wacker Dr.), February 2018.

Somonauk United Presbyterian Church, 14030 Chicago Rd, Somonauk, IL, September 18, 2016.

The church was founded by Scotch and Scotch-Irish pioneers who came from Washington County, New York, north of Albany on Vermont’s western border. These hardy stock settled in the Green Mountain foothills of New York 40 years before the American Revolution. The first permanent settlers to the rolling prairies of this part of northern Illinois, between the Fox and Rock Rivers, about 60 miles west of upstart Chicago, arrived in 1842.

The Beveridges, George (1785-1870) and Ann (née Hoy) (1788-1865) settled into a log cabin built by a trapper in 1834—the first permanent house in the County. The church first met in the log cabin that was located just northeast of where the present church, built in 1875, still stands. (See-History of the Somonauk United Presbyterian church near Sandwich, DeKalb County, Illinois, by Jennie M. Patten, 1928, Chicago and S. H. Lay and T. G. Beveridge, “Somonauk United Presbyterian Church,” Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society (1908-1984) Vol. 18, No. 3 (Oct., 1925), pp. 694-720.)

[H]A[PP]Y BIR[THD]AY Charlotte, February 24, 2021.

love, February 24, 2021.

The glass-block wall of Phyllis’ Musical Inn, 1800 West Division Street
Chicago, Illinois, June 20, 2018.

Phyllis’ Musical Inn is a true Chicago institution, and its memories are still being made in its 68th year.

It was opened by Phyllis and Clem Jaskot Sr. in 1954. Today the bar is Wicker Park’s oldest live music venue. Clem Jaskot, Jr. with his wife runs the Musical Inn today. Clem Jaskot, Sr. passed away in 1997 and Phyllis Jaskot died at 93 years old in November 2020.

When the bar was founded, and throughout the 1950s, it sat on a strip with many other polka music taverns on Division Street between Ashland and Western Avenues known as “Polish Broadway.” Phyllis’ is located in Wicker Park, on the corner of Division and Wood, and was a companion bar to the Czar Bar, Rainbo Club, The Lucky Stop, and many others in the neighborhood.

In the 1950s, Chicago writer Nelson Algren lived steps away from Phyllis’s across the street at 1815 W. Division above Louis Miller & Son hardware store. In the much gentrified Wicker Park neighborhood that building, like many others of the mid-20th century and earlier, is gone.

The Jaskots met in Chicago— Clem was from Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin and Phyllis was a coal-miner’s daughter from Pennsylvania. Phyllis arrived into town with her suitcase and accordion.

By the mid-1970s Clem Sr. and Phyllis ceased their live polka music. Starting in the mid1980s, the Musical Inn became a place for a range of popular contemporary music as well as starting a tradition of Tuesday night open-mike poetry slams, and art shows.

Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum, Baltimore, Maryland, March 2010. George Herman “Babe” Ruth was born on Emory Street in Baltimore’s Pigtown neighborhood on February 6, 1895, the first son of George and Kate Ruth. 

At 7 years old, Babe Ruth was sent to St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys, a strict but fair boarding school for disadvantaged youth run by the Xavierian Brothers only 4 miles from the Ruth home in Pigtown. In addition to schooling, vocational training and personal discipline, the brothers taught Babe the game of baseball. Soon, Ruth was the school’s star pitcher. Though St. Mary’s closed in 1950, the field where the young Ruth first played ball can still be visited. Enthusiastic local press clippings in 1912 and 1913 drew the attention of the Orioles who signed a 19-year-old Ruth in 1914 to a $600 contract (about $16,000 today) to play pro baseball.

After he joined the Yankees in 1920, Babe Ruth went on to become baseball’s greatest slugger and one of the game’s most iconic athletes. His 1921 season may be the greatest in the history of major league baseball: that year Babe Ruth blasted a new record of 59 homeruns, batted in 171 RBI’s, scored 177 runs, had a batting average of .376 and an unprecedented .846 slugging percentage. The babe’s popularity made him a superstar and when the Yankees moved into a new stadium in 1923, it was known as “The House that Ruth Built.”

Babe Ruth, star pitcher, St. Mary’s Baltimore, 1912.

Baltimore’s Pigtown (a.k.a. Washington Village), Emory and Portland Streets, March 2010. Baltimore’s Pigtown, just steps from Oriole Park at Camden Yards, is a 19th-century, immigrant, working-class neighborhood. In 1827, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was founded in Baltimore on an 18th century plantation that became Pigtown. The blue collar culture of Pigtown began with the railroad workers in the backdrop of American intra-emigration and European immigrants who arrived to the major industrial city of Baltimore and opened shops and saloons in the neighborhood.

The Pickwick Theater Building, 1928, Zook & McCaughey, 3-11 South Prospect Avenue, 6-12 South Northwest Highway, downtown Park Ridge, Illinois, April 2015.

The Art Deco movie palace opened in 1928. Originally, the theater had a seating capacity of 1,450. The tower is 100 feet tall and capped by an ornamental iron lantern. The theater building was designed by architectural partners R. Harold Zook (1889-1949) and younger William F. McCaughey who both apprenticed under Howard Van Doren Shaw (1869-1926), a leader in the American Craftsman movement. Zook and McCaughey did significant work in Park Ridge as well as other affluent Chicago suburbs.

The building is noted for its Art Deco style of architecture, defined by an emphasis on geometric designs, bright colors, and a range of ornament and motifs. Sculptor and designer Alfonso Iannelli (1888-1965) maintained a studio and home in Park Ridge. Iannelli contributed much to the Pickwick’s interior architecture and ornamentation. The Pickwick Theater Building’s marquee is one of the most recognized structures in Park Ridge. It was also seen on syndicated television as it was in the opening sequence for “At the Movies” with Siskel & Ebert in 1983. (See it here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hAKkYQKIVs)

The building was placed on the National register of Historic Places in 1975.

Quotations: Chief Joseph (c.1840-1904), Nez Percé leader. (3 Quotes).

Somebody has got our horses. Reaction to violation of surrender treaty terms by U.S. Government.

“When the terms of surrender were violated by the government, [Chief] Joseph did not dig up the tomahawk and go on the warpath again…. He…. spoke with a straight tongue , and was a gentleman of his word. Nor did he blame [Maj. Gen. O. O.] Howard or [Col. Nelson A.] Miles for what his people suffered. He remarked only the above. (Quoted in Saga of Chief Joseph, H. A. Howard, University of Nebraska Press, 1978, p. 348.)

If you tie a horse to a stake, do you expect him to grow fat? If you pen an Indian up on a small spot of earth, and compel him to stay there, he will not be contented, nor will he grow and prosper. I have asked some of the great white chiefs where they get their authority to say to the Indian that he shall stay in one place, while he sees white men going where they please. They cannot tell me. Chief Joseph (c.1840-1904), Nez Percé, North American Review, Cedar Falls, Iowa, April 1879.

The gravesite of Chief Joseph. Photograph by author.

My son, never forget my dying words, this country holds your father’s body. Never sell the bones of your father and mother. Chief Joseph (c.1840-1904), Nez Percé. To his son on defending his homeland and people.

Quotations: Pope Saint John XXIII (Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli), 1881-1963. (2 Quotes).

One day John XXIII visited the Hospital of the Holy Spirit in Rome. Deeply stirred by the pope’s visit, the mother superior whose nuns administered the hospital, went up to introduce herself. “Most Holy Father,” she announced, “I am the Superior of the Holy Spirit!” “Well, I must say you’re lucky,” the pope said. “I’m only the Vicar of Jesus Christ!” Wit and Wisdom of Good Pope John, collected by Henri Fesquet.

“Giovanni, why don’t you sleep? Is it the Pope or the Holy Spirit who governs the church? It’s the Holy Spirit, no? Well, then, go to sleep, Giovanni!” Wit and Wisdom of Good Pope John, collected by Henri Fesquet.

Quotations: Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. Author. (4 Quotes).

Featured Image: Henry Miller, Paris. Photography by Brassaï, 1931.

We have two American flags always: one for the rich and one for the poor. When the rich fly it, it means that things are under control; when the poor fly it, it means danger, revolution, anarchy. The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).

The world dies over and over again, but the skeleton always gets up and walks. The Wisdom of the Heart, “Uterine Hunger,” (1941).

Actually we are a vulgar, pushing mob whose passions are easily mobilized by demagogues, newspaper men, religious quacks, agitators and the like. To call this a society of free peoples is blasphemous. What have we to offer the world besides the superabundant loot which we recklessly plunder from the earth under the maniacal delusion that this insane activity represents progress and enlightenment? The Air-Conditioned Nightmare, Preface (1945) on the people of the U.S.

Perhaps I am still very much an American. That is to say, naïve, optimistic, gullible…In the eyes of a European, what am I but an American to the core, an American who exposes his Americanism like a sore. Like it or not, I am a product of this land of plenty, a believer in superabundance, a believer in miracles. Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymous Bosch (part 3), “Paradise Lost,” 1957.

Quotations: The Book of Joshua (Books of the Bible). (2 Quotes).

Feature Image: Joshua with Moses, stained glass panel, 15th century, Church of St. Lawrence, Nuremberg, Germany. 

The Book of Joshua is the sixth book in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. It is the first book of the Deuteronomistic history or the story of Israel from the conquest of Canaan to the Babylonian exile. It contains many different kinds of highly synthesized and edited literary materials. These include various etiologies (explanations of customs, institutions, landmarks, etc.) and battle narratives. These materials are thereby complex from a literary perspective.  

The Book of Joshua relates the military campaigns of the Israelites in central, southern and northern Canaan. It tells of the destruction of their enemies and the division of the land among the Twelve Tribes. These developments are conveyed by two set-pieces—the first by God commanding  the conquest of the land (Chapter 1) and, the second, by Joshua exhorting the people to a faithful observance of the Law revealed to Moses (Chapter 23).

Is the Book of Joshua of historical value? Clearly historical, the Israelites gained control of Canaan—and the book relates that it was accomplished by a series of battle victories which is not unreasonable to presume. The book’s broad narrative is generally to be founded on history.

The Book of Joshua also contains many creations of the popular imagination or folklore which makes the historical reliance on its details presented as fact in the narrative not indisputable. Where the meagerness of materials is present, however, the ancient compilers and editors did not elaborate based on broad or simple textual statements but moderated descriptions to the available details. Today’s modern archaeology, while able to provide insight into human activity in Canaan throughout this time period (13th century BCE and later), the historical quest to establish a clear, concrete connection to episodes mentioned in the Book of Joshua by this science can be hard to support.  

The figure of Joshua in the role of significant military leader is integral to the narrative and found in the most ancient, original text (i.e., his role in the formation of the 12-tribe league at Shecham, Chapter 24), among other examples. All factors point to Joshua’s significant role in the conquest.  

In terms of the Book of Joshua’s religious aspects there are several layers of religious tradition that are held in common but with singular or special emphases. The book relates the conquest as an act of God. For man, the act of conquest or “holy war” was closely associated to an act of worship though that idea was based on an older, primitive religious practice that was not practiced at least by the time the Book of Joshua was completed in the mid6th century BCE. The Book of Joshua also conveys another religiously primitive idea–that of collective guilt (Chapter 7).

Religious tradition is expressed in the ideas of God’s covenant and that morality is based on obedience to the Law as part of their close personal relationship to God. In chapters 13 to 21 which were added later, the book expresses God’s fidelity to the Israelites to the point of restoration of total possession of the land although while in exile that idea would be a dream. The idea of a future Israel that is restored was further embellished religiously—such as the 12 tribes gathered to worship at the sanctuary and providing carefully for its tribal priests (Chapter 22).

Joshua’s speech ends the book with a warning about the future (Chapter 23) though the following and last chapter added later ends differently. In that last chapter the people of Israel proclaim their choice to serve God (Joshua 24:24) and that the choice of Israel to be in relationship with God is a free one (24:15). The narrative of the Book of Joshua closes with Joshua’s death at the age of 110 years old and his burial among the heritage of the descendants of Joseph (24: 29, 32).

SOURCE: The Jerome Biblical Commentary, edited by Raymond E. Brown, S.S., Joseph A Fitzmeyer, S.J., and Roland E. Murphy, O. Carm., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1968.

Chapter 10.

12 It was then, when the LORD delivered up the Amorites to the Israelites, that Joshua prayed to the LORD, and said in the presence of Israel: Sun, stand still at Gibeon, Moon, in the valley of Aijalon! 13 The sun stood still, the moon stayed, while the nation took vengeance on its foes. Joshua 10:12-13.

24When they brought the five kings out to Joshua, he summoned all the army of Israel and said to the commanders of the soldiers who had marched with him, “Come forward and put your feet on the necks of these kings.” They came forward and put their feet upon their necks. 25Then Joshua said to them, “Do not be afraid or dismayed, be firm and steadfast. This is what the LORD will do to all the enemies against whom you fight.” 26Thereupon Joshua struck and killed the kings, and hanged them on five trees, where they remained hanging until evening. Joshua 10: 24-26.