Author Archives: jwalsh2013

About jwalsh2013

John P. Walsh is an art historian, writer and photographer. He has an M.A. in Modern Art History, Theory and Criticism from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and taught Modern Art History at Northwestern University. Follow his work @ http://johnpwalshblog.com/ Pinterest @ http://www.pinterest.com/lang52tr/ Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/john.p.walshiii.

Hollywood Glamour Portraits: Hedy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr, M-G-M, 1940. Photograph by Laszlo Willinger.

Hedy Lamarr (1914-2000) posed for this glamour portrait in 1940. The legendary Austrian beauty was 27 years old. Since her first American film, Algiers, in 1938, Lamarr was considered one of the most beautiful women in the movies, if not the world.

This publicity photograph of Lamaar is for the 1940 American adventure film Boom Town. It co-stars Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy and Claudette Colbert. This beautiful color portrait was taken by László Willinger (1909-1989), a German-born emigré who made many glamour photographs of celebrities starting in the later 1930’s.

In Boom Town, Lamarr plays Karen VanMeer, a sophisticated and elegant corporate spy. She is recruited by Clark Gable who plays “Big John” McMasters, an oil speculator.

Text©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

Madame Bovary (1949) by Vincente Minnelli: the Waltz Scene.

In the 1949 film Madame Bovary directed by Vincente Minnelli, beautiful and charming Madame Bovary (Jennifer Jones) meets wealthy Rodolphe Boulanger (Louis Jourdan) at a ball where he literally sweeps her off her feet. Aggravated by her husband (Van Heflin) not fitting into high society, Madame Bovary begins a love affair with Rodolphe. Though the pair scheme to elope to Italy, Rodolphe does not love Madame Bovary. 

The Waltz Scene was Filmed to the Music 

One of the film’s most carefully wrought and delightful scenes is this ballroom sequence. It was one of the last segments to be shot. The film footage was tailored to Miklós Rózsa’s music. Minnelli explained to the composer in advance the camera movements so he could write the music (in an arrangement for two pianos). The scene was then filmed to match it. Their artistic collaboration produced one of cinema’s most original scenes uniting robust music with weaving and gliding images.

“Break the Windows”

As Rodolphe swirls her, Emma Bovary’s head spins until she becomes dizzy. The viewer sees her disorientation as the camera takes her viewpoint. She keeps dancing but asks for fresh air. Her request leads to an extraordinary and incredible reaction by the stewards. They start to smash the ballroom’s windows with chairs to help her cool down. This fantastically destructive action of broken glass aligns with the destruction of Emma’s romantic illusions throughout the film. 

Night of Repressed Passion

Along with her husband’s boorish behavior at the ball and everywhere else, her romantic disappointment leaves Madame Bovary feeling publicly humiliated. Instead of love and excitement, she runs out of the ball in shame. Though she yearns for happiness and excitement, her pursuit of selfish pleasures ends in scandal and ruin.

In reaction to Madame Bovary becoming dizzy while waltzing with a new lover, the stewards smash the ballroom windows to give her air. This extraordinary action is ultimately symbolic of the destruction of Madame Bovary’s romantic illusions.
Jennifer Jones as Madame Bovary offers a performance that is elegant and beautiful and equally insightful to the character’s selfish and nervous personality that in the end finds her own death more attractive than living with her shattered romantic illusions.

Madame Bovary Movie Poster.
Publicity photo for Madame Bovary showed the love triangle of Jennifer Jones, Louis Jourdan, and Van Heflin.
In Vincente Minnelli’s 1949 film Madame Bovary, 30-year-old Jennifer Jones plays Gustave Flaubert’s doomed character from his 1856 serial novel.

Jennifer Jones as Madame Bovary offers a performance that is elegant and beautiful and equally insightful to the character’s selfish and nervous personality that in the end finds her own death more attractive than living with her shattered romantic illusions.

 

 

©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

Images of Ballet.

Pointe shoesPointe shoes.

Marie Rambert (1888-1982), prominent dance teacher in British Ballet, with students in the late 1940’s. She founded Rambert Dance Company, still active today.
Ballet developed mainly in Russia in the late nineteenth century that included the revival of the male role and rise of the pas de deux.

Irving Penn (1917-2009), Ballet Society, New York, 1948.

Christmas Choral Concert: Bel Canto Chorus, Basilica of St. Josaphat, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s independent 100-voice Bel Canto Chorus–founded in 1931–performs carols and hymns in the historic Basilica of St. Josaphat, a Polish-style church in Milwaukee completed in 1901 and boasting one of the largest copper domes in the world.

The Bel Canto Chorus is made up of singers from throughout southeastern Wisconsin and northeastern Illinois. Their Christmas concert is one of their most locally popular of the year and its weekend of Christmas concerts is often sold out.

In this 2012 performance, Music Director Richard Hynson conducts. Hynson has been music director of the Bel Canto Chorus since 1987 and in 2012 received the American Prize in Choral Conducting, Community Choral Division. The Bel Canto Chorus has an impressive international performance portfolio, including performances at the Spoleto Music Festival in Italy and music festivals in France, the UK, Ireland, Canada and Argentina and Uruguay.

This wonderful performance features the Stained Glass Brass and Bel Canto Boy Chorus, both conducted by Ellen Shuler.

PROGRAM:
Once in Royal David’s City – H.J. Gauntlett
Ding Dong Merrily on High – George Radcliffe Woodward
A Spotless Rose – Herbert Howells
O Come, All Ye Faithful – J.F. Wade
Welcome All Wonders – Richard Dirksen
Gloria-John Rutter
Silent Night-Franz Grüber
Joy To The World – George Frideric Handel
We Wish You A Merry Christmas – arranged by John Rutter

This performance is approximately one hour.

Notes©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

Christmas Choral Concert: The Tuskegee University Golden Voices Choir, University Chapel, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) was called “The Sage” of Tuskegee Institute outside Montgomery, Alabama. Founded by Washington in 1881, the Institute thrives today as Tuskegee University, home to more than 3,000 students from the U.S. and dozens of foreign countries.

The historically African-American college boasts several academic distinctions today, especially in the broad range of the sciences, engineering, medicine and math. This stems from the coeducational school’s founding value of industrial education.

Booker T. WashingtonBooker T. Washington.

Tuskegee is home to the first bioethics center in the United States: the National Center for Bioethics in Research & Health Care. Founded in 1999, the Center is devoted to the exploration of the core moral issues which underlie research and medical treatment of African-Americans as well as other under-served populations by bringing together in dialogue the sciences, humanities, law and religion.

In addition to excellence in these important academic fields, Tuskegee, with over 60 degree programs, offers study in the Liberal Arts, Fine Arts, and Humanities. This includes The Tuskegee University Golden Voices Choir in the Department of Fine & Performing Arts.

Tuskegee’s first singing groups were organized by Washington as early as 1884 with the choir formally founded by Washington in 1886. Booker T. Washington, who grew up in slavery as a child, had witnessed music and singing’s central value to the African-American experience.

In chapter one of his highly readable and interesting American classic autobiography, Up From Slavery, he writes: “Finally the war closed, and the day of freedom came. It was a momentous and eventful day to all upon our plantation. We had been expecting it. Freedom was in the air, and had been for months… As the great day drew nearer, there was more singing in the slave quarters than usual. It was bolder, had more ring, and lasted later into the night. Most of the verses of the plantation songs had some reference to freedom. True, they had sung those same verses before, but they had been careful to explain that the “freedom” in these songs referred to the next world, and had no connection with life in this world. Now they gradually threw off the mask, and were not afraid to let it be known that the “freedom” in their songs meant freedom of the body in this world.“

Washington insisted that Tuskegee’s always augmenting student body at the Christian nondenominational school sing spirituals at weekly Chapel worship services. Washington, and all Tuskegee’s successor presidents to the present day, have maintained a deep love and appreciation for the arts, especially above all music. Booker T. Washington wrote the students, exhorting them: “…If you go out to have schools of your own, have your pupils sing [Negro spirituals] as you have sung them here, and teach them to see the beauty which dwells in these songs…”

In each academic year the Tuskegee University Golden Voices Choir performs extensively throughout the state of Alabama, as well as nationally and internationally (Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Canada in 2018).

Their Christmas Concert is held each December in the University Chapel under the direction of Dr. Wayne Anthony Barr. Dr. Barr is assisted by Mrs. Brenda Shuford at the piano who herself is a lifelong music educator and ordained minister at her Baptist church in Montgomery. Also taking significant part is Warren L. Duncan who heads the Department of Fine & Performing Arts at Historic Tuskegee University.

The choir has had a momentous performance history performing before American presidents and this entire concert offers the listener the flavor of its wonderful spirit and deep talent shared at Christmas-time.

The concert is approximately two hours and fifteen minutes.

Notes©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

Christmas Choral Concert: The Angeles Chorale, First United Methodist Church, Pasadena, California, performs John Rutter’s “Gloria.”

For over 40 years, the Angeles Chorale has brought inspiring choral music to greater Los Angeles, California. It is an all-volunteer choral group comprised of about one hundred voices. The Angeles Chorale was founded in 1975 as one of the local Valley Master Chorales and merged in 1987 with California State University Northridge’s Masterworks Chorale under the baton of Artistic Director John Alexander. For the next nine years Alexander led the assemblage into a professional standard, and changed its name to the Angeles Chorale. Donald Neuen took over the podium in the 1996-1997 season. Neuen, Director of Choral Activities at UCLA, focused the chorale’s repertoire on classical music masterworks for chorus and orchestra such as Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Mahler. For the 2010-2011 season, Neuen handed the baton to its present-day Artistic Director Dr. John Sutton, who had been with the chorale since 2004. Sutton continues to actively study with Professor Neuen, now retired, among others, and utilizes the Angeles Chorale’s versatility and mastery in classic music and current music in concert programming.

While only about twenty minutes long, John Rutter’s chorale masterpiece Gloria is reputed to be a challenging work – and this performance at First United Methodist Church Pasadena on December 15, 2012, while continuing to strive for perfection in minor technicalities, remains overall excellent. The Angeles Chorale really takes the three movement work as its own. This is a musical performance that is vibrant, active, personal, alive, and while not perhaps the most refined performance of this favorite work on record, it provides the listener with an aural experience that leaves one on the edge of their seat which is a power not typically found in other performances. This engaging vibrancy could be part of Sutton’s ease and familiarity with popular musical forms, such as for film and television, that infuses this choral piece’s unique harmonies, structures, and rhythms with a branded verve and, if imperfectly, then confidently based on the chorale and brass’s obvious performative exuberance and enjoyment.

John Rutter’s Gloria is the English composer’s musical setting of parts of the Latin Gloria which is a Christian hymn. Rutter’s work was written in 1974 and has been part of the Christmas concert tradition ever since. The Latin Gloria is also known as “The Hymn of the Angels” because they are the words the angels sang when, in Luke 2:14, the angelic host hovered over the shepherds in the field to announce Christ’s birth. “Gloria in excelsis Deo,” the shepherds heard the angels sing, “Glory to God in the highest.” (20.23 minutes).

  1. Allegro vivace – “Gloria in excelsis Deo”
  2. Andante – “Domine Deus”
  3. Vivace e ritmico – “Quoniam tu solas sanctus.”

The performance is approximately 20 minutes.

Notes©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

Christmas Choral Concert: St. Bavo Cathedral Choir, Haarlem, Netherlands.

The St. Bavo Cathedral Choir performs Christmas carols and other seasonal music for voice, many in modern settings. Recorded in Haarlem in Advent 2012 (December 16) in the Cathedral Basilica St. Bavo –not the iconic Grote Kerk in Haarlem’s main square but the Catholic church constructed between 1895 and 1930 – the program includes well-known carols along with Anton Diabelli’s Pastoral Mass In F Major For Solos, Chorus and Orchestra, Op. 147, and excerpts from Benjamin Britten’s 11-part choral piece, A Ceremony of Carols, Op. 28. Fons Ziekman conducts the Promenade Orchestra and Sanne Nieuwenhuijsen directs the chorus with soloists Jasper Schweppe, Anouk van Laake, Floris Claassens, Hidde Kleikamp and Frank de Ruijter. The impressive vocal and orchestral ensemble is accompanied by Ton van Eck on organ and Auréli Husslage on harp.

Program:
John Francis Wade (1711-1786) : Oh, come all ye faithful
Anton Diabelli (1781-1858): Pastoral Messe in F-dur, op.147
Willcocks: The First Nowell
Benjamin Britten (1913-1976): A Ceremony of Carols
Richards: Over the Country
Britten: A New Year Carol
Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847): Hark the herald angels sing
Vaughan Williams (1872-1958): Fantasia on Christmas Carols

The concert is 1 hour, 3 minutes and 48 seconds long.

Notes©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

Gargoyles of Notre Dame de Paris.

PHOTOS I FORGOT I HAD: INTERNATIONAL.

CSS-Gargoyle Notre Dame Paris July 1979Gargouille (Gargoyle), Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris, photographed Thursday, July 12, 1979.

Tourists can visit the “gargoyles” on the façade of Notre-Dame in Paris by reaching the passageway to the outdoor balustrade of the tower base. There is a second balustrade at the very top of the tower but it is not open to the general public.

The exuberant Gothic design of the Cathedral, a stone structure that dominates the Île de la Cité in this most ancient part of Paris, was built in stages. A project instigated by the Bishop of Paris, Maurice de Sully (in office, 1160-1196), commenced with the construction of the choir in 1163. The front portals followed around 1200. The next stage included the towers which began their ascent into the Paris skyline in the 1240’s.

Facade Notre Dame de ParisFaçade, Notre Dame de Paris.

From the ground level upwards to the top of the cathedral every detail of the building is meticulously construed. One of its world famous and popular attractions is the various gargoyles: birds, humanoids, chimeras, etc., that dot the medieval building. With changing artistic taste, the Gothic period architecture was mostly reviled in Paris after about the year 1400. Accompanying political and cultural events in the nineteenth century–especially the crowning of Napoléon I (1769-1821) as Emperor of France in Notre Dame de Paris in 1804 and the publication of the French Romantic Gothic novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo in 1831–public interest in Gothic design and Notre Dame in particular (which had fallen into great disrepair) was revived. Under French architects Eugène Viollet-le-Duc (1814-1879) and Jean-Baptiste-Antoine Lassus (1807-1857) most of Notre Dame was overhauled in the 1840’s. As with many of its medieval-style treasures, the cathedral’s many gargoyles also underwent some reconstitution but the question remains as to how many precisely were reconstituted and to what specific extent.

s- CHIMERA ND Paris Jul 1979 -
Gargouille (Gargoyle), Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris, photographed Thursday, July 12, 1979.

 

ND de Paris

©John P. Walsh. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, which includes but is not limited to facsimile transmission, photocopying, recording, rekeying, or using any information storage or retrieval system.

 

Robert Frank: The Americans, 1954-1956. Part 2.

#38 Barber shop through screen door-McClellanville, SC 1Americans 38. Barber shop through screen door–McClellanville, South Carolina, 1955.

#39 Backyard-Venice West, CA, 1956Americans 39. Backyard–Venice West, California, 1956.

#40 Newburgh, New York, 1955Americans 40. Newburgh, New York, 1955.

#41 Luncheonette- Butte, Montana, 1956

Americans 41. Luncheonette— Butte, Montana, 1956.

#42 Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1955Americans 42. Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1955.

#43 Bar- New York City, 1955Americans 43. Bar— New York City, 1955.

#44 Elevator-Miami Beach, 1955Americans 44. Elevator— Miami Beach, 1955.

#45 Restaurant - U.S. 1 leaving Colombia, SC, 1955Americans 45. Restaurant— U.S. 1 leaving Columbia, South Carolina, 1955.

#46 Drive-in movie - Detroit, 1955Americans 46. Drive-in movie—Detroit, 1955.

#47 Mississippi River, Baton Rouge, LA, 1955Americans 47. Mississippi River, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1955.

#48 St. Francis, gas station. and City Hall - Los Angeles, 1956Americans 48. St. Francis, gas station. and City Hall—Los Angeles, 1956.

#49 Crosses at scene of highway accident - U.S.91, Idaho, 1956Americans 49. Crosses at scene of highway accident—U.S.91, Idaho, 1956.

#50 Assembly line - Detroit, 1955Americans 50. Assembly line —Detroit, 1955.

#51 Convention Hall - Chicago, 1956Americans 51. Convention Hall—Chicago, 1956.

#52 Men's room, railway station - Memphis, TN, 1955Americans 52. Men’s room, railway station—Memphis, Tennessee, 1955.

#53 Cocktail Party - New York City, 1955Americans 53. Cocktail Party—New York City, 1955.

#54 Salt Lake City, Utah, 1956Americans 54. Salt Lake City, Utah, 1956.

#55 Beaufort, SC, 1955Americans 55. Beaufort, South Carolina, 1955.

#56 Funeral-St. Helena, SC, 1955Americans 56. Funeral—St. Helena, South Carolina, 1955.

#57 Chinese cemetery - San Francisco, 1956Americans 57. Chinese cemetery—San Francisco, 1956.

#58 Political Rally-Chicago, 1956Americans 58. Political Rally—Chicago, 1956.

#59 Store window-Washington, D.C. , 1957Americans 59. Store window—Washington, D.C. , 1957.

#60 Television studio - Burbank, CA, 1956Americans 60. Television studio—Burbank, California, 1956.

#61 Los AngelesAmericans 61. Los Angeles, 1955-1956.

#62 Bank - Houston, TX, 1955Americans 62. Bank—Houston, Texas, 1955.

#63 Factory-Detroit, 1955Americans 63. Factory—Detroit, 1955.

#64 Department store- Lincoln, Nebraska, 1956Americans 64. Department store—Lincoln, Nebraska, 1956.

#65 Rodeo-New York City, 1954Americans 65. Rodeo—New York City, 1954.

#66 Movie premiere-Hollywood, 1955Americans 66. Movie premiere—Hollywood, 1955.

#67 Charity Ball - New York City, 1954Americans 67. Charity Ball—New York City, 1954.

#68 Cafeteria-San Francisco, 1956Americans 68. Cafeteria—San Francisco, 1956.

#69 Drug store-Detroit, 1955Americans 69. Drug store—Detroit, 1955.

#70 Coffee shop, railway station-Indianapolis, 1956Americans 70. Coffee shop, railway station—Indianapolis, 1956.

#71 Chattanooga, TN 1955Americans 71. Chattanooga, Tennessee, 1955.

#72 San Francisco, 1956Americans 72. San Francisco, 1956.

#73 Belle Isle- DetrotAmericans 73. Belle Isle—Detroit, 1955.

#74 Public park - Cleveland, OhioAmericans 74. Public park—Cleveland, Ohio, 1955.

#75 no border Courthouse square-elizabeth NC 1955Americans 75. Courthouse square—Elizabethville, North Carolina, 1955.

#76 Picnic ground - Glendale, California, 1955Americans 76. Picnic ground—Glendale, California, 1955.

#77 Belle Isle-Detroit, 1955Americans 77. Belle Isle—Detroit, 1955.

#78 DetroitAmericans 78. Detroit, 1955.

#79 ChicagoAmericans 79. Chicago, 1956.

#80 Public park - Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1955Americans 80. Public park—Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1955.

#81 001City Hall - Reno, Nevada, 1956Americans 81. City Hall—Reno, Nevada, 1956.

#82 Indianapolis, 1956Americans 82. Indianapolis, 1956.

#83 U.S. 90, en route to Del Rio, Texas, 1955Americans 83. U.S. 90, en route to Del Rio, Texas, 1955.

Americans 84. Ford Plant, Detroit, 1955.

Robert Frank: The Americans, 1954-1956. Part 1.

Parade - Hoboken, New Jersey 1955Americans 1.  Parade — Hoboken, New Jersey, 1955.

 

City fathers - Hoboken NJ 1955Americans 2.  City fathers — Hoboken, New Jersey, 1955.

 

3. political rally -Chicago 1956
Americans 3.  Political rally — Chicago, 1956.

 

Funeral-St. Helena, South Carolina 1955
Americans 4.  Funeral — St. Helena, California, 1955.

 

5. Rodeo -Detroit 1955Americans 5.  Rodeo — Detroit, 1955.

 

6. Savannah Georgia 1955Americans 6. Savannah, Georgia, 1955.

 

7. Navy Recruiting Station, Post Office-Butte Montana 1956Americans 7. Navy Recruiting Station, Post Office — Butte, Montana, 1956.

 

8. En route from New York to Washington, club car 1954-55Americans 8. En Route From New York to Washington, Club Car, 1954-55.

 

9. Movie Premiere-Hollywood 1956Americans 9. Movie premiere — Hollywood, 1956.

 

10. Candy Store-New York City 1955Americans 10. Candy store — New York City, 1955.

 

11. Motorama -Los Angeles 1956Americans 11. Motorama — Los Angeles, 1956.

 

12. New York City 1955 betterAmericans 12. New York City, 1955.

 

13. Charleston, South Carolina 1955Americans 13. Charleston, South Carolina, 1955.

 

14 Ranch Market- Hollywood 1956Americans 14.  Ranch market — Hollywood, 1956.

 

15 Butte, Montana 1956Americans 15.  Butte, Montana, 1956.

 

16 Yom Kippur -East River, New York City 1954Americans 16.  Yom Kippur — East River, New York City, 1954.

 

17. Fourth of July-Jay, New York 1954Americans 17. Fourth of July — Jay, New York, 1954.

 

18. Trolly-New Orleans 1955Americans 18. Trolley — New Orleans, 1955.

 

19. Canal street - New Orleans 1955Americans 19. Canal Street — New Orleans, 1955.

 

20 Rooming House - Bunker Hill, Los Angeles 1956Americans 20. Rooming house— Bunker Hill, Los Angeles, 1956.

 

21.Yale Commencement -New Haven Green, New Haven CTAmericans 21. Yale Commencement — New Haven Green, New Haven, Connecticut, 1956.

22. Cafe - Beaufort, South Carolina , 1955Americans 22. Cafe — Beaufort, South Carolina, 1955.

 

23. Georgetown, SC 1955Americans 23. Georgetown, South Carolina, 1955.

 

24. Bar - Las Vegas, NevadaAmericans 24. Bar — Las Vegas, 1955.

 

25. Hotel Lobby- Miami Beach 1955Americans 25. Hotel Lobby — Miami Beach, 1955.

 

26. View from hotel window - Butte, Montana, 1956Americans 26. View from hotel window — Butte, Montana, 1956.

 

27. Metropolitan Life INsurance Building-New York City 1955Americans 27. Life Insurance Building  — New York City, 1955.

 

28. Jehovah's Witness - Los Angeles 1955Americans 28. Jehovah’s Witness — Los Angeles, 1955.

 

29. Bar- Gallup New Mexico 1955Americans 29. Gallup, New Mexico, 1955.

 

30. U.S. 30 between Ogallala and North Platte, Nebraska 1956Americans 30. U.S. 30 between Ogallala and North Platte, Nebraska, 1956.

 

31. Casino- Elko, Nevada 1956Americans 31. Casino — Elko, Nevada, 1956.

 

32. U.S. 91 Leaving Blackfoot, Idaho 1956Americans 32. U.S. 91, leaving Blackfoot, Idaho, 1956.

 

33. St Petersburg, Florida 1955Americans 33. St. Petersburg, Florida, 1956.

 

34. Covered Car-Long Beach, California 1956Americans 34. Covered car — Long Beach, California, 1956.

 

35. Car accident - U.S. 66 between Winslow and Flagstaff, Arizona 1955 betterAmericans 35. Car accident — U.S. 66, between Winslow and Flagstaff, Arizona, 1955.

 

36. U.S. 285, New Mexico 1955Americans 36. U.S. 285, New Mexico, 1955.

 

37. Bar-Detroit 1955Americans 37. Bar — Detroit, 1955.