Author Archives: jwalsh2013

About jwalsh2013

John P. Walsh is an art historian, writer and photographer. He has an M.A. in Modern Art History, Theory and Criticism from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and taught Modern Art History at Northwestern University. Follow his work @ http://johnpwalshblog.com/ Pinterest @ http://www.pinterest.com/lang52tr/ Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/john.p.walshiii.

My Photography: Street II. (33 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

The Logan Theatre, Chicago, February 2013.

Lakefront, East Chicago, Indiana, July 2016.

Chicago, The Loop, November 2017.

July 2017.

Downers Grove, Illinois, July 2018.

Chicago, Michigan Avenue, August 2015.

Chicago, Michigan Avenue, May 2014.

July 2016, Chicago.

July 2016, Chicago.

July 2016, Chicago.

Chicago, September 2015.

Chicago (Navy Pier), September 2016.

West Loop/East Garfield Park, Chicago, October 2016.

Chicago, August 2015.

Mount Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church, 4600 S. King Drive, Chicago, October 2016. Originally a synagogue founded by German Jewish immigrants in 1861, the Neo-Classical building was home to Chicago Sinai Congregation from 1912 until the 1940s. In 1961, Mount Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church moved into the building. The church brought a strong commitment to social justice and played an instrumental role in bringing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference to Chicago. Since the late 1960’s the church has provided a neighborhood food bank.

Boarding up storefronts during the COVID-19 pandemic and George Floyd national protests, June 2020.

June 2020.

Demonstrators, George Floyd national protests, June 2020. This protest in Downers Grove, Illinois attracted thousands of peaceful protesters to combat the national problem of police brutality against African-Americans and others.

In the wake of the killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, national protests against police brutality sprouted across the country and globe. In a protest in Downers Grove, Illinois, this demonstrater holds a sign listing the “8 Can’t Wait ” Police Reforms. June 2020.

George Floyd national protests, Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

Demonstrators. George Floyd protest. June 2020.

Demonstrator, George Floyd protest, June 2020.

George Floyd protest, Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

George Floyd protest, Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

Black Lives Matter/George Floyd protest, Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

Black Lives Matter protest, Downers Grove, Illinois. June 2020.

Chicago (Navy Pier), September 2015.

Spring shower, May 2019.

Double portrait, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 2018.

My Photography: Sports.

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

pick-off, July 2018.

hey batter, batter, May 2018.

one on one, Chicago, August 2015.

Runners, May 2018.

May 2018.

infield play, May 2018.

tee off, July 2016.

rounding first base, May 2018.

the call, July 2018.

On base, July 2018.

swing, July 2018.

stealing second, July 2018.

Out at third, July 2018.

touch football, Aurora, Illinois, September 2018.

Mosaic: Four Seasons by Marc Chagall, 1974. Chase Tower Plaza, Chicago, Illinois.

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

May 2014.

My Photography: Odds and Ends. (7 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

morning porch, April 2020.

St. Joseph statue, April 2020.

Cleaners, Wilmette, Illinois, 2016.

Formal Garden (Fritz Reuter statue), Humboldt Park, Chicago, July 2015.

Artist’s table, Aurora, Illinois, 2015.

Naperville, Illinois, March 2018.

The Skyway (Chicago), July 2016.

My Photography: Motorcycles & Trains. (20 Photos).

Photographs and Text ©John P. Walsh

1932 Model G Servi-Car Side-Valve V-Twin. The model ran for 41 years and offered high crown fenders and a cargo hold that could pack 500 pounds. The Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

West Loop, 2017.

“L”, Chicago, 2017.

The Ride with Pride Motorcycle Run, sponsored by Pridefest and the Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 2018.

BSNF Railway Line, April 2020.

Contemporary “Fat Bob” fuel tank with paint color scheme “Anniversary Yellow, ” 1954. The Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

2002 XL883C Sportster Custom OHV-V Twin. Loaded with factory-installed additions. The Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Union Pacific West Line, 2018.

Former trainman, Union Pacific Railroad. Along BNSF Railway, May 2020.

Quotations: Archbishop Derek Worlock (1920-1990).

Derek Worlock (February 4, 1920 – February 6. 1996) was an English priest in the Roman Catholic Church and the Archbishop of Liverpool.

Worlock was committed to collaboration with his fellow Christians and co-authored the books Better Together and With Hope in our Hearts (1995) with the Anglican Bishop of Liverpool, David Sheppard. His motto was Caritas Christi eluceat (“For the Shining Light of Christ”).

Worlock was awarded the Freedom of the City of Liverpool award in 1994 and appointed as a Companion of Honour in 1996. At his death, a memorial for him designed by British sculptor Stephen Broadbent (b. 1961) and paid for by public donations, was situated halfway down Liverpool’s Hope Street which is the same street that joins both the Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals. See it here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/newfolder/2535308455

I am my brother’s keeper, and he’s sleeping pretty rough these days. London OBSERVER, December 16, 1990. (On the homeless).

PHOTO SOURCES:
File: Detail full length Sheppard-Worlock Statue 2017-2.jpg
CreatorRodhullandemu
License CC BY-SA 4.0
Source WikiCommons.

File: Detail from the statue of Derek Worlock, the former Catholic Archbishop of Liverpool 2.jpg
Created: 18 September 2008
CC BY-SA 2.0

File: Coat of arms
Attribution 3.0 Unported license. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons. You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the work. Under the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Uk_rc_liverpool_worlock.png

Coat of Arms, Most Rev. Derek Worlock, Metropolitan Archbishop of Liverpool.

My Photography: Signs. (27 Photos).

Photographs and Text ©John P. Walsh

Swap Mart, Villa Park, Illinois, May 2018.

Pabst Blue Ribbon, Lisle, Illinois, 2018.

#HotHair Color, Chicago, 2018.

Rebirth, April 2020.

Covid-19 quarantine, Downers Grove, Illinois, April 2020.

Covid-19 quarantine, April 2020.

Covid-19 quarantine, April 2020.

Covid-19 quarantine, April 2020.

Phone, 2018.

The Wilmette Theater (1913), 2016.

The Tivoli Theatre (1928), Downers Grove, Illinois, 2016. The 1,000+-seat movie theater was designed by Van Gurten and Van Gurten architects and opened on Christmas Day, 1928. The theater was the second in the U.S. fitted for sound movies. The first was the 1200-seat Brooklyn Paramount Theater in New York City that opened in November 1928 and closed as a movie palace in the early 1960’s.

Symphony Center, Chicago, 2014.

Miss Dior, Macy’s, State Street, Chicago, 2018.

Chicago Loop Synagogue (1958), 2015.

The Auditorium Theatre (1889), Chicago, December 2017. The 3900-seat theatre was designed by Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan. Music: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. In 2019 choreographer Christopher Wheeldon’s acclaimed turn-of-the-century tale opens on Christmas Eve, 1892, mere months before the grand opening of the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, as young Marie and her mother prepare for a Christmas Eve potluck celebration. The magic of the season takes hold when a visit from The Great Impresario sets off a whirlwind journey of romance and adventure through a dreamlike World’s Fair. A must-see tradition boldly reimagined for a new generation. The production includes the singing voices of five local choral groups.

Chicago, 2015.

Yeti in My Spaghetti (Hey, Get Out of My Bowl!), April 2020.

The Braddock Road, south-central Pennsylvania, March 20, 2010.

The Braddock Road was a military road built in 1755 in what was then British America and is now the United States. It was the first improved road to cross the barrier of the ridge lines of the Appalachians. It was constructed by about 2,500 troops of the Virginia militia and British regulars commanded by General Edward Braddock (1695-1755), part of the expedition to conquer the Ohio Country from the French at the beginning of the French and Indian War (1756-63). George Washington, who was aide-de-camp to Braddock, had pioneered this route a year earlier when he traveled into the Ohio Country and met Native American leader, Tanacharison (1700-1754).  The expedition gave Washington his first field military experience as well as other American military officers whose numbers profited from this military outing later during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Braddock’s men had to cut a road wide enough to accommodate the wagons and draft animals that accompanied them, as well as the siege artillery that they brought along to use against the new Fort Duquesne established by the French in 1754 at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers.  Progress was painstakingly slow until Braddock split the force into a lead column of about 1,500 men and the rest as a support column to drag artillery and supplies. The flying column made rapid progress, and with each day, the distance between it and the support column increased. This marker is on the (later) National Pike (Route 40) between Elk Park and Farmington, Pennsylvania.

Cloaked Cats, April 2020.

flexible mannequins (Memorial Day weekend), May 2018.

Restoration, Grand Theater (1925), Wheaton, Illinois, May 2018.

April 2020.

Poetry (CTA Green Line), Oak Park, Illinois, January 2018.

Near Chicago-Kansas City Expressway (Eisenhower), Forest Park, Illinois. July 2016.

During the COVID-19 pandemic and George Floyd national protests, June 2020. Near Chicago.

Demonstrators, June 2020.

Chicago, September 2015.

Quotations: Chief Joseph (c.1840-1904), Nez Percé leader.

If you tie a horse to a stake, do you expect him to grow fat? If you pen an Indian up on a small spot of earth, and compel him to stay there, he will not be contented, nor will he grow and prosper. I have asked some of the great white chiefs where they get their authority to say to the Indian that he shall stay in one place, while he sees white men going where they please. They can not tell me. Chief Joseph (c.1840-1904), Nez Percé, North American Review, Cedar Falls, Iowa, April 1879.

Somebody has got our horses. Reaction to violation of surrender treaty terms by U.S. Government. “When the terms of surrender were violated by the government, [Chief] Joseph did not dig up the tomahawk and go on the warpath again…. He…. spoke with a straight tongue , and was a gentleman of his word. Nor did he blame [Maj. Gen. O. O.] Howard or [Col. Nelson A.] Miles for what his people suffered. He remarked only the above. (Quoted in Saga of Chief Joseph, H. A. Howard, University of Nebraska Press, 1978, p. 348.)

Quotations: Pope Saint John XXIII (Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli), 1881-1963.

One day John XXIII visited the Hospital of the Holy Spirit in Rome which is administered by a religious sisterhood. The mother superior, deeply stirred by the pope’s visit, went up to introduce herself: “Most Holy Father, I am the Superior of the Holy Spirit!” “Well, I must say you’re lucky,” the pope replied. “I’m only the Vicar of Jesus Christ!” Cited in Wit and Wisdom of Good Pope John, collected by Henri Fesquet and translated by Salvatore Attanasio.

Quotations: Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. Author.

Featured Image: Henry Miller, Paris. Photography by Brassaï, 1931.

We have two American flags always: one for the rich and one for the poor. When the rich fly it, it means that things are under control; when the poor fly it, it means danger, revolution, anarchy. The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).

The world dies over and over again, but the skeleton always gets up and walks. The Wisdom of the Heart, “Uterine Hunger,” (1941).