Category Archives: My Photography Street

Street Photography II. (40 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

The Logan Theatre, Chicago, illinois, February 2013.

Lakefront, East Chicago, Indiana, July 2016.

Chicago (The Loop), November 2017.

Downers Grove, Illinois, July 2018.

Chicago (Michigan Avenue), August 2015.

Chicago (Michigan Avenue), May 2014.

Chicago, July 2016.

Chicago, July 2016.

Chicago, July 2016.

Chicago, September 2015.

Chicago (Navy Pier), September 2016.

Chicago, August 2015.

Chicago (West Loop/East Garfield Park), October 2016.

Chicago (Millennium Monument), September 2016.

Chicago, Mount Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church, 4600 S. King Drive, October 2016. Originally a synagogue founded in 1861 by German Jewish immigrants, the neo-Classical building was home to Chicago Sinai Congregation from 1912 until the 1940s. In 1961, Mount Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church moved into the building. The church community brought a strong commitment to social justice and played an instrumental role in bringing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference to Chicago. Since the late 1960’s the church has provided a neighborhood food bank.

Chicago (Navy Pier), September 2015.

May 2019.

June 2020.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 2018.

Chicago (Edgewater), 2014.

Oakbrook, Illinois, summer 2019.

Summer 2019.

Summer 2019.

Metropolitan Correctional Center, Chicago (1975) in late 2017. The 28-story building is a right triangle shape. Architect Harry Weese (1915-1998) designed each cell with a floor-to-ceiling slit window, 7 feet (2.1 m) long by 5 inches (130 mm) wide. The windows were narrow enough that they did not require bars and beveled out to allow natural light to pass inside.

Chicago, August 2017.

Chicago (Magnificent Mile), May 2016.

Chicago (Skyline Walk), September 2015.

Crown Fountain (Millennium Park), Chicago, September 2016.

Chicago (Old Town), August 2017.

Concert, October 2014.

Chicago, (Wabash Avenue near Adams Street), August 2017.

Chicago, (Wabash Avenue and Jackson Street), August 2017.

Chicago (Wabash Avenue near Congress Parkway, renamed Ida B. Wells Drive in 2018), September 2015.

Chicago, August 2015.

violin shop, Wilmette, Illinois, June 16, 2016.

bus stop, Chicago, February 2, 2018.

Downtown (Theater District), Chicago, February 2018.

Chicago, February 2018.

at Symphony Center, Chicago, October 2014.

Oakbrook, June 2019.

Sports. (15 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

the pick-off, July 15, 2018.

batter’s stance, May 27, 2018.

one on one, August 7, 2015.

runners, May 2018.

September 2018.

shortstop, May 27, 2018.

hello ball, July 2016.

rounding base, May 27, 2018.

the call, July 15, 2018.

McCloskey on first, July 15, 2018.

swing and miss, July 15, 2018.

stealing second, July 15, 2018.

Out at third, July 15, 2018.

in the dirt, May 27, 2018.

Odds & Ends. (20 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

morning porch, April 2020.

St. Joseph, April 2020.

dry cleaners, Wilmette, Illinois, 2016.

Naperville, Illinois, March 2018.

Artist’s table, 2015.

The Skyway, Chicago, July 2016. The main feature of the Skyway is a 1⁄2-mile-long steel truss bridge, known as the “High Bridge.”

BNSF Rail Line, July 2020.

Below the fold, November 2017.

pay phone, 2018.

Grand Theatre (1925), Wheaton, Illinois, May 2018.

alley, Oak Park, Illinois, January 2018.

May 2018.

School bus, August 2015.

grotto, Forest Park, Illinois, August 2015.

zipper, June 2018, Chicago.

handcrank organ, c. 1930, Old Stone Church (Methodist Episcopal), 1861, Lemont, Illinois, June 2015.

The Bard, Rockford, Illinois, July 2017.

50%

Dry dock, Wilmette Harbor, Wilmette, Illinois, December 2017.

violin necks and scrolls, Wilmette Illinois, June 16, 2016.

four-leaf clover, February 24, 2021.

Trains & Motorcycles. (22 Photos).

Photographs and Text ©John P. Walsh

1932 Model G Servi-Car Side-Valve V-Twin. The model ran for 41 years and offered high crown fenders and a cargo hold that could pack 500 pounds. The Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

West Loop, 2017.

“L”, Chicago, 2017.

The Ride with Pride Motorcycle Run, sponsored by Pridefest and the Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 2018.

BSNF Railway Line, April 2020.

Contemporary “Fat Bob” fuel tank with paint color scheme “Anniversary Yellow, ” 1954. The Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

2002 XL883C Sportster Custom OHV-V Twin. Loaded with factory-installed additions. The Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Union Pacific West Line, 2018.

Former trainman, Union Pacific Railroad. Along BNSF Railway, May 2020.

Amtrak Midwest, July 2020.

FLH “Uptight” OHV V-Twin, dated 1958. Customization includes extensive metalwork accents, specialty lighting, chrome-tipped dual exhaust, debut of Duo-Glide front and back full suspension, handlebar riser mounted AM radio, and more. The Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 2018.

Signs. (40 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

Villa Park, Illinois, May 2018.

Lisle, Illinois, 2018.

Chicago, 2018.

April 2020.

April 2020.

April 2020.

Chicago, 2015.

April 2020.

The Wilmette Theatre, 1122 Central Ave., in downtown Wilmette, Illinois, 2016. The theater was built in 1914, and originally called the Central Theatre. Owned by Encyclopedia Britannica Films since 1950, the vintage movie house had been shuttered when Richard S. Stern bought and re-opened it in 1966. Stern came from a family of movie theater owners. His father, Henry Stern, opened what is credited as the first art film theater house in Chicago–the Cinema Theater at Michigan and Chicago Avenues opened in 1929. After it was demolished in 1981, a skyscraper and high-end retail store were built on the site. In 1966, Richard Stern asked his father for a loan, and bought the property. Decades later, after renovating the Wilmette Theater into a two-screen operation, Richard Stern decided to sell it. In 2006, Stern sold the Wilmette Theatre to a small group of community investors interested in the movie theatre’s unique history and continuing to operate it showing top-quality first run and art films. The lobby portion of the building retains much of its vintage charm.

Sources: https://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/wilmette/ct-wml-richard-stern-obit-story-tl-1029-20151027-story.html; http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/980;http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/7675

The Tivoli Theatre (1928), Downers Grove, Illinois, 2016. 1,000+-seat movie theater designed by Van Gurten & Van Gurten architects. Opened Christmas Day, 1928. It is the second in the U.S. fitted for sound movies. The first was the 1200-seat Brooklyn Paramount Theater in New York City that opened in November 1928 and closed in the early 1960’s.

Chicago, 2014.

Macy’s on State Street, Chicago, 2018.

Ten Commandments, Chicago Loop Synagogue (1958), 2015.

The Nutcracker by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, December 2017. The 3,900-seat Auditorium Theatre (1889) in Chicago was designed by Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan.

April 2020.

Chicago, 2015.

April 2020.

The Braddock Road, PA, March 2010.

The Braddock Road was a military road built in 1755 in what was then British America and is now the United States. It was the first improved road to cross the barrier of the ridge lines of the Appalachians. It was constructed by about 2,500 troops of the Virginia militia and British regulars commanded by General Edward Braddock (1695-1755), part of the expedition to conquer the Ohio Country from the French at the beginning of the French and Indian War (1756-63). George Washington, who was aide-de-camp to Braddock, had pioneered this route a year earlier when he traveled into the Ohio Country and met Native American leader, Tanacharison (1700-1754).  The expedition gave Washington his first field military experience as well as other American military officers whose numbers profited from this military outing later during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Braddock’s men had to cut a road wide enough to accommodate the wagons and draft animals that accompanied them, as well as the siege artillery that they brought along to use against the new Fort Duquesne established by the French in 1754 at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers.  Progress was painstakingly slow until Braddock split the force into a lead column of about 1,500 men and the rest as a support column to drag artillery and supplies. The flying column made rapid progress, and with each day, the distance between it and the support column increased. This marker is on the (later) National Pike (Route 40) between Elk Park and Farmington, Pennsylvania.

April 2020.

April 2020. Postponed to 2021.

CTA stop, Oak Park, Illinois, January 2018.

June 2020.

Forest Park, Illinois. July 2016.

Chicago, September 2015.

Chicago, July 2015.

Chinatown, Chicago, August 2015.

Chicago, September 2015.

Chicago, June 2018.

Fried Green Tomato Fest, Aug 26, Watseka, Illinois, August 2017.

Wicked at the Ford Center for the Performing Arts, 24 W. Randolph Street, Chicago, Illinois, December 2017. The Oriental Theater, now the James M. Nederlander Theatre, opened in 1926. It is one of the many ornate movie palaces built in Chicago by the architectural firm of Rapp and Rapp.

The venue presented both movies and vaudeville acts in its first years. When talkies arrived, the Oriental Theatre became predominantly a movie house in the 1930s. Live stage, theatrical, and concert performances continued for Chicago audiences in a venue that currently seats over 2,000 people.

Duke Ellington and his orchestra made frequent appearances at the Nederlander/Oriental Theatre which was built in the exotic ornate style. Some of the legendary stars who were seen at the Nederlander/Oriental Theatre were Judy Garland, George jessel, Fanny Brice, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Cab Calloway, Eddie Cantor, Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Jean Harlow, Billie Holiday, Bob Hope, Al Jolson, Danny Kaye, Jerry Lewis, The Marx Brothers, The Three Stooges, Frank Sinatra, Sophie Tucker, Sarah Vaughan, Henny Youngman, and many more.

The theatre underwent a multi-million dollar restoration in the mid 1990s and reopened in 1998.  From June 2005 through January 2009, the theater housed a full production of Wicked, making it the most popular stage production in Chicago history. In December 2017 a traveling national tour of Wicked had just started its Chicago run.

Murphy’s Food King, Kentland, Indiana, August 2017.

Chicago (Uptown), August 7, 2015.

Wow Bao-Theater District, Chicago (1 W. Wacker Dr.), February 2018.

Somonauk United Presbyterian Church, 14030 Chicago Rd, Somonauk, IL, September 18, 2016.

The church was founded by Scotch and Scotch-Irish pioneers who came from Washington County, New York, north of Albany on Vermont’s western border. These hardy stock settled in the Green Mountain foothills of New York 40 years before the American Revolution. The first permanent settlers to the rolling prairies of this part of northern Illinois, between the Fox and Rock Rivers, about 60 miles west of upstart Chicago, arrived in 1842.

The Beveridges, George (1785-1870) and Ann (née Hoy) (1788-1865) settled into a log cabin built by a trapper in 1834—the first permanent house in the County. The church first met in the log cabin that was located just northeast of where the present church, built in 1875, still stands. (See-History of the Somonauk United Presbyterian church near Sandwich, DeKalb County, Illinois, by Jennie M. Patten, 1928, Chicago and S. H. Lay and T. G. Beveridge, “Somonauk United Presbyterian Church,” Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society (1908-1984) Vol. 18, No. 3 (Oct., 1925), pp. 694-720.)

[H]A[PP]Y BIR[THD]AY Charlotte, February 24, 2021.

love, February 24, 2021.

The glass-block wall of Phyllis’ Musical Inn, 1800 West Division Street
Chicago, Illinois, June 20, 2018.

Phyllis’ Musical Inn is a true Chicago institution, and its memories are still being made in its 68th year.

It was opened by Phyllis and Clem Jaskot Sr. in 1954. Today the bar is Wicker Park’s oldest live music venue. Clem Jaskot, Jr. with his wife runs the Musical Inn today. Clem Jaskot, Sr. passed away in 1997 and Phyllis Jaskot died at 93 years old in November 2020.

When the bar was founded, and throughout the 1950s, it sat on a strip with many other polka music taverns on Division Street between Ashland and Western Avenues known as “Polish Broadway.” Phyllis’ is located in Wicker Park, on the corner of Division and Wood, and was a companion bar to the Czar Bar, Rainbo Club, The Lucky Stop, and many others in the neighborhood.

In the 1950s, Chicago writer Nelson Algren lived steps away from Phyllis’s across the street at 1815 W. Division above Louis Miller & Son hardware store. In the much gentrified Wicker Park neighborhood that building, like many others of the mid-20th century and earlier, is gone.

The Jaskots met in Chicago— Clem was from Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin and Phyllis was a coal-miner’s daughter from Pennsylvania. Phyllis arrived into town with her suitcase and accordion.

By the mid-1970s Clem Sr. and Phyllis ceased their live polka music. Starting in the mid1980s, the Musical Inn became a place for a range of popular contemporary music as well as starting a tradition of Tuesday night open-mike poetry slams, and art shows.

Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum, Baltimore, Maryland, March 2010. George Herman “Babe” Ruth was born on Emory Street in Baltimore’s Pigtown neighborhood on February 6, 1895, the first son of George and Kate Ruth. 

At 7 years old, Babe Ruth was sent to St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys, a strict but fair boarding school for disadvantaged youth run by the Xavierian Brothers only 4 miles from the Ruth home in Pigtown. In addition to schooling, vocational training and personal discipline, the brothers taught Babe the game of baseball. Soon, Ruth was the school’s star pitcher. Though St. Mary’s closed in 1950, the field where the young Ruth first played ball can still be visited. Enthusiastic local press clippings in 1912 and 1913 drew the attention of the Orioles who signed a 19-year-old Ruth in 1914 to a $600 contract (about $16,000 today) to play pro baseball.

After he joined the Yankees in 1920, Babe Ruth went on to become baseball’s greatest slugger and one of the game’s most iconic athletes. His 1921 season may be the greatest in the history of major league baseball: that year Babe Ruth blasted a new record of 59 homeruns, batted in 171 RBI’s, scored 177 runs, had a batting average of .376 and an unprecedented .846 slugging percentage. The babe’s popularity made him a superstar and when the Yankees moved into a new stadium in 1923, it was known as “The House that Ruth Built.”

Babe Ruth, star pitcher, St. Mary’s Baltimore, 1912.

Baltimore’s Pigtown (a.k.a. Washington Village), Emory and Portland Streets, March 2010. Baltimore’s Pigtown, just steps from Oriole Park at Camden Yards, is a 19th-century, immigrant, working-class neighborhood. In 1827, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was founded in Baltimore on an 18th century plantation that became Pigtown. The blue collar culture of Pigtown began with the railroad workers in the backdrop of American intra-emigration and European immigrants who arrived to the major industrial city of Baltimore and opened shops and saloons in the neighborhood.

The Pickwick Theater Building, 1928, Zook & McCaughey, 3-11 South Prospect Avenue, 6-12 South Northwest Highway, downtown Park Ridge, Illinois, April 2015.

The Art Deco movie palace opened in 1928. Originally, the theater had a seating capacity of 1,450. The tower is 100 feet tall and capped by an ornamental iron lantern. The theater building was designed by architectural partners R. Harold Zook (1889-1949) and younger William F. McCaughey who both apprenticed under Howard Van Doren Shaw (1869-1926), a leader in the American Craftsman movement. Zook and McCaughey did significant work in Park Ridge as well as other affluent Chicago suburbs.

The building is noted for its Art Deco style of architecture, defined by an emphasis on geometric designs, bright colors, and a range of ornament and motifs. Sculptor and designer Alfonso Iannelli (1888-1965) maintained a studio and home in Park Ridge. Iannelli contributed much to the Pickwick’s interior architecture and ornamentation. The Pickwick Theater Building’s marquee is one of the most recognized structures in Park Ridge. It was also seen on syndicated television as it was in the opening sequence for “At the Movies” with Siskel & Ebert in 1983. (See it here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hAKkYQKIVs)

The building was placed on the National register of Historic Places in 1975.

Cars & Trucks. (15 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

1939 Chevrolet, Des Plaines, Illinois, 2018.

2019 Dodge Challenger, Oakbrook, Illinois, 2018.

Chicago, 2016.

Plymouth, 1940 license plate, Wheaton, Illinois, 2018.

1968 Chevrolet Corvair, Downers Grove, Illinois, 2018.

Chevrolet Corvette, Downers Grove, Illinois, 2017.

Rusty but trusty, 2018.

Oldsmobile Cutlass Convertible, Chicago, Illinois, 2015.

Kaiser Jeep M-725 (1967), Dixon, Illinois, 2017.

1950s Chevy 210, DeKalb Co., Illinois, 2016.

1960s Ford Falcon, Ozaukee Co., Wisconsin, 2018.

Ford Mustang, April 2020.

Chevrolet Camaro SS, May 2018. The SS model is equipped with a 6.2L LT1 V8 engine offered both as a 6-speed manual and an 8-speed automatic. The SS is capable of 455 horsepower and 455 lb.-ft. of torque, performing a 0-60 in 4.0 seconds. 

 Mini Cooper Hatch (BMW), May 2018.

Lamborghini, Chicago, August 2014.

Street Photography I. (53 Photos).

Photographs ©John P. Walsh

Chicago (South Chicago), June 2018.

Chicago (Near West Side), June 2018.

Chicago, June 2018.

Chicago (Bucktown), 2015.

Chinatown (Chicago), 2018.

Chicago, 2018.

Chicago (Chinatown), September 2014.

Double Vision.

Chicago (Gold Coast), 2017.

All the World's a Stage (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), June 9, 2018.

Milwaukee (Avenues West), Wisconsin, June 2018.

Chicago, Congress Parkway and Wabash Avenue, 2015.

Chicago, 2015.

Chicago (Pritzker Park), July 2015.

Chicago, Adams Street and Wabash Avenue, 2014.

Oakbrook, Illinois, June 2019.

Oakbrook, Illinois, June 2019.

Milwaukee, June 2016.

Chicago, July 2016.

Chicago (Michigan Avenue), May 2016.

Chicago (State Street), 2016.

Chicago (Millennium Park), 2016.

Chicago (Loop), May 2014.

Lincoln Park, August 7, 2015.

Oakbrook, Illinois, June 2019.

Oakbrook, Illinois, June 2019.

June 2019.

Oakbrook, Illinois, June 2019.

Oakbrook, Illinois, June 2019.

Chicago (Bridgeport), October 2016.

Chicago, 2015.

Chicago, June 2018.

Chicago (Goose Island), August 2016.

Oakbrook, Illinois, June 2019.

Covid-19, March 2020.

Social distancing, March 2020.

Covid-19, March 2020.

April 2020.

May 2020.

Chicago (Streeterville), September 2013.

Chicago, August 2015.

Chicago, State and Washington Streets, July 2015.

Chicago (Symphony Center), October 2014.

Chicago (West Town), June 2018.

Margie’s Candies, Chicago (Bucktown), 2017.

The package, Chicago, February 3, 2018.

Chicago (Millennium Park), December 2017.

Chicago Loop, 418 S. Wabash, September 2015.

Chicago, August 2017.

Chicago, Lincoln Park, August 2015.

Madison & Wabash, Chicago, February 2018.

Chicago, September 25, 2016.

Midwest Roads, U.S.A. (72 Photos).

Photographs and Text ©John P. Walsh

final-copy-2-keep-going-template-sharp-dsc_0701-dell-rheas-chicken-basket-4-24-16

Dell Rhea’s Chicken Basket is 22 miles southwest of downtown Chicago. Its address is 645 Joliet Road, Willowbrook, Illinois. It first opened in 1926 as a gas station/lunch counter on a brand-new Route 66. In 1939 the original owner, Irv Kolarik, served fried chicken for the first time. That was over 80 years ago.

The one-story brick commercial building was built next to the original building in 1946 by architect Eugene F. Stoyke (1912-1993). It became a full-service restaurant at the time of the post-World War II travel boom. The path of U.S. Route 66 traveled the western two-thirds of the U.S. from Chicago to Los Angeles, California, a distance of more than 2,000 miles.

Dell Rhea’s window bay of nine single-light-glass-and-wood-canted windows is original as was the neon-and-metal sign in this photograph taken in 2016 (an exact replica of the original sign was erected in 2017). With a fireplace anchoring the restaurant’s north wall, a cocktail lounge was added to the south in 1956. In front of the restaurant on U.S. 66 there was Bluebird Bus stop which people could take to St. Louis and send packages across country.

In 1962 Interstate 55, a major expressway connecting Chicago, St. Louis, Memphis and New Orleans basically retired U.S. Route 66 as a major thoroughfare. In 1963 the Chicken Basket was bought by Chicago businessman Delbert Francis “Dell” Rhea (1907-1992) who reinvigorated the eatery for the new era. The popular Chicken Basket was owned and managed by the Rhea family until 2019. That year the Lombardi family bought the restaurant with the promise to continue the tradition by keeping intact the original recipe which has remain unchanged since 1946.

Vintage roadhouse decor and family-oriented service joined to a menu featuring fresh and deliciously succulent cooked-to-order fried chicken makes the Chicken Basket a mandatory Midwest Roads stop.

SOURCES: http://www.chickenbasket.com/; https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/dell_rheas_chicken_basket_hinsdale.html .

“(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66” is a popular rhythm & blues standard composed in 1946 by American songwriter Bobby Troup (1918-1999). It was a hit that same year for Nat King Cole who, with the King Cole Trio, first recorded the song. Troup got the idea for the song when taking a ten-day cross country trip with his wife in a Buick from Pennsylvania to California on U.S. Routes 40 and 66. The lyrics include some of the popular cities and towns on the route. Troup, who later became a film and television actor, certainly drove by what is today Dell Rhea’s Chicken Basket on that historic road trip.

Grundy Co., Illinois, 2016. 

INTRODUCTION.

These are some of my photographs featuring the people, places, and things I have met along today’s American Midwest roads.

I have a personal affection for the American Midwest. I grew up in Chicago and its suburbs, and went to grade school, high school and university here.

Growing up In the Midwest I had my family, friends, diverse outings, engaging jobs, and, later on, married here. I continue to enthusiastically explore this vast region that’s rightly called “The Heart of America.”

Memories of the Middle West — its sights, sounds, smells, and tastes — and mostly in Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and Michigan — are the mother’s milk of my life. Through steamy summers, multi-colored autumns, ice-bitten winters, and flowering springs to traverse Midwest roads spell adventure — both then and now.

The American Midwest is filled with human stories and diverse and awesome natural beauty. There is timeless nostalgia, and, when those things don’t entice for the moment, unexpected curiosities.

For those who love it, the Midwestern terrain possesses what Edgar Lee Masters (1868-1950) spoke about in his last major book, The Sangamon, as “magic in that soil, in the plains, the borders of forest, the oak trees on the hills.” The poet was sure that “if you should drive through (this region)…strange dreams would come to you, and moreover those dreams would tally with mine.”

The region continues to offer the sightseer magical things including impressive remnants of an American Indian mound-building culture and encounters with animals and birds, wild and domestic. Edgar Lee Masters understood that it is the Midwestern people – individualistic, hospitable, industrious, good willed, courageous and independent – who bestow to the central part of the country its greatest distinction. It is this populace that, like the past, builds what is frequently photographed on Midwest roads and in its towns and cities: canals, roads, barns and farms, houses. In the 21st century new things of interest can be seen on a Midwest road trip– such as cellphone towers or wind turbines — while older things, like barns, disappear.

Many famous Americans and international figures have traversed the Midwest roads, some perhaps unknown or unexpected–James Monroe (in 1785), Charles Dickens (1842), John Muir (1849), Henry David Thoreau (1861),  Antonín Dvořák (1893), Winston Churchill (1946). Others were born or lived here, such as Carl Sandburg, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Edison, Edgar Lee Masters, Walt Disney, Mark Twain, Jane Addams, Harry S Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, Ronald and Nancy Reagan, Barack and Michelle Obama,  Frank Lloyd Wright, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., John Wayne, Wyatt Earp, “Wild Bill” Hickok, Jesse James, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, Dinah Washington (“Queen of the Blues”), and many more.

It is Abraham Lincoln whose memory is most famously linked to Midwest Roads. Riding his horse, “Old Bob,” Lincoln loved to travel the Eighth Judicial Circuit as a defense lawyer. It is to the sixteenth U.S. president and the Midwestern spirit he manifested that this photographic essay is dedicated.

SOURCES: E.L. Masters quotes from The Sangamon by Edgar Lee Masters with Introduction by Charles E. Burgess, University of Illinois Press, Urbana & Chicago, 1988 (first published 1942), p.6.

Asian Garden (Man), July 2018

Farm garden, DuPage Co. (Downers Grove), Illinois, July 2018.

Farm garden, DuPage Co. (Downers Grove), Illinois, July 2018.

Illinois Farm (Bureau County IL) June 5, 2017.

Bureau Co., Illinois, June 2017.

Crucifix and wind turbine (Bureau County IL), June 5, 2017.

Graveyard crucifix and altar with wind turbine, Bureau Co., Illinois, 2017.

Wedding party, Waukesha Co., (Pewaukee), Wisconsin, 2017.

working farm 5.31.17 jpw

Walworth Co., Wisconsin, 2017.

Tuesday Taco jpwalsh

DeKalb Co. (Kirkland), Illinois, 2017.

red barns jpwalsh

Northern Illinois, 2017.

Dixon, Illinois, 2017. The Ronald Reagan Trail is a route in Illinois that follows sites of interest associated with the 40th president of The United States. Reagan grew up in Dixon, Illinois. Route 26 originally ran north-south about 25 miles from Freeport, Illinois to Polo, Illinois. In 1937, IL-26 was extended about 15 miles north from Freeport to the Illinois-Wisconsin state line and about 15 miles south from Polo to Dixon, Illinois. In 1969, IL-26 was extended almost 100 miles from Dixon south to East Peoria, Illinois.

Honor Guard, Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home, Lee Co. (Dixon), Illinois, June 5, 2017.

Walworth Co., Wisconsin, 2017.

1992 Case IH 7150, DeKalb Co., Illinois, 2016.

Midwest roads.

DeKalb Co., Illinois, October 2016.  

Midwest Roads.

Grundy Co., Illinois, 2016.

Kendall Co., Illinois, 2016.

Grundy Co., Illinois, 2016. 

Midwest Roads.

LaSalle Co., Illinois, 2016. 

Tazewell Co., Illinois, 2016. 

Midwest Roads.

LaSalle Co., Illinois, 2016.  

LaSalle Co., Illinois, 2016.

Midwest roads.

Grundy Co., Illinois, August 2016. 

Midwest roads.

Detail of downtown bi-centennial mural, LaSalle Co. (Ottawa), Illinois, 2016.

DeKalb Co., Illinois, 2016.

Midwest Roads.

Lake Co., (Wauconda), Illinois, August 2016. 

Kendall Co. (Oswego), Illinois, April 2016.

Iroquois Co., (Watseka) Illinois, 2017.

LaSalle/Grundy Cos. (Seneca), Illinois, 2016.

Leaf blowers, 2018.

Cook/DuPage Cos., (Schaumburg), Illinois, 2016.

DuPage Co. (Downers Grove), Illinois, 2018.

DuPage Co. (Wheaton), Illinois, 2018.

U.S. Route 20 is the longest road in the country. It stretches east to west from Boston, Massachusetts to Newport, Oregon– about 3,100 miles. It started on the east coast in the early to mid-1920’s. It reached Illinois in 1938 and is since mostly unchanged. In 1955 the Illinois General Assembly designated the length of U.S. 20 in Illinois the U.S. Grant Memorial Highway. The sign was produced in late 2006.

Walworth Co. (Lake Geneva), Wisconsin, May 2017.

Santuario de Guadalupe, Cook Co. (Des Plaines), Illinois, May 2018.

Santuario de Guadalupe, Des Plaines, Illinois, May 2018.

Morning Mass, Santuario de Guadalupe, Des Plaines, Illinois, May 2018.

Winnebago Co. (Rockford), Illinois, 2017.

The Worker, Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), Camp Chicago-Lemont, Company 612, established June 4, 1933. Cook/DuPage Cos. (Willow Springs), Illinois.

The CCC was a major part of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. The Federal program provided manual labor jobs related to conservation and the development of natural resources on mostly rural lands owned by government entities. The CCC was specifically designed to give jobs to young men so to relieve their families who had difficulty finding jobs during the Great Depression. The CCC was active from April 1933 to July 1942. In those nine years and 3 months the program employed approximately 3 million young men who, with food, clothing and shelter included, earned $30 a month, of which $25 had to be sent home to their families.

Capt. A. Lincoln, Illinois Volunteer Militia, Black Hawk War, 1832, bronze, 1930. Sculpture by Leonard Crunelle (1872-1944). Lee Co. (Dixon), Illinois.

During the 1832 Black Hawk War, 23-year-old Abe Lincoln was a captain in what is today the Illinois National Guard. Lincoln enlisted in the Volunteers on April 21, 1832 near Richland Creek in Sangamon County, about halfway between New Salem and Springfield, Illinois. He was mustered into State service the next day at Beardstown, Illinois, on the Illinois River almost 40 miles to the west and elected captain, a position Lincoln said he was surprised and proud to receive.

Illinois and adjoining states at this time were at the edge of the American frontier. Lincoln was mustered into the U.S. service on May 3, 1832 near Janesville, Wisconsin and mustered out on May 27, 1832 as they camped in Ottawa, Wisconsin, without having fired a shot. On that same day, Lincoln re-enlisted as a private in Captain Iles’ company and when that expired re-enlisted again in Captain Early’s company. Lincoln was finally mustered out of military service on July 10, 1832 at Whitewater, Wisconsin.

For a time, young Lincoln was stationed at Fort Dixon on the Rock River in Dixon, Illinois where this statue, unveiled in late September 1930, stands. The sculptor is French-born Leonard Crunelle (1872-1944). Crunelle’s immigrant family came to Illinois in 1889 and settled in Decatur, about 40 miles east of Springfield, Lincoln’s hometown. As Crunelle worked in the local mines, he started making fired clay sculptures. His work was brought to the attention of Lorado Taft (1860-1936) who brought young Crunelle to Chicago to study at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Crunelle also began to do decorative work for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893.

The bronze sculpture of Lincoln, who later as a lawyer and politician expressed pride in his brief military service, is one of the first attempts to depict the Great Emancipator in his youth.

Old Glory, DuPage Co., Illinois, June 2020.

Uptown, McDonough Co. (Macomb), Illinois, May 2006.

Chicago, Illinois, June 2018.

Buying corn,  Iroquois County (Watseka), Illinois, August 2017.

DeKalb Co., Illinois, June 2017.

Fox River, Kane Co. (West Dundee), Illinois, August 2014.

Kendall Co. Illinois, September 18, 2016.

DuPage Co. (Downers Grove), Illinois, November 2017.

DuPage Co. (Wheaton), Illinois, August 2015.

DuPage Co., Illinois, October 2017.

DuPage Co., Illinois, October 2018.

barn house, DuPage Co. (Downers Grove), Illinois, August 2017.

First Baptist Church bus, Kankakee Co. Illinois, August 2017.

White Fence Farm, Will Co. (Romeoville), Illinois, May 2017. White Fence Farm was established in the 1920s by the son of a wealthy coal baron. Stuyvesant ‘Jack’ Peabody opened the restaurant to feed his guests who visited his nearly 500-acre horse farm on the other side of a newly opened U.S. Route 66. In the mid-1930’s Peabody started to promote the domestic wine industry by featuring California wines at the restaurant. Since 1954, the Hastert family has owned and operated White Fence Farm. Advertising itself as the “World’s Greatest Chicken,” the restaurant building has been expanded many times under the Hasterts. Within a country farm manor ambience, it boasts several dining rooms that can seat over 1,000 diners. White Fence Farm continues to offer today some of freshest and best-tasting fried chicken along old U.S. Route 66. The restaurant is a popular destination, especially on weekends, and during the warm weather months, when people in the broader community as well as tourists arrive in droves.

farmer’s market (cheese seller), DuPage Co., Illinois, September 2017.

Anderson Japanese Gardens, Winnebago Co. (Rockford), Illinois. The Anderson Japanese Gardens is a popular 12-acre Japanese garden in Rockford. Construction began in 1978, on the lands surrounding Rockford businessman John Anderson’s home. Anderson was inspired by gardens he visited in japan as well as other Japanese gardens in the U.S. Under the guidance of renowned master craftsman and landscape designer Hoichi Kurisu, the Andersons’ land along Rockford’s Spring Creek was transformed into an outdoor space of water, wood, stone, and flora representing 1,000 years of Japanese horticultural tradition.

Newton Co. (Goodland), Indiana, August 1, 2017.

Winter storm, DuPage Co., January 26, 2021.

Winter storm, DuPage Co., January 31, 2021.

snowy trees, January 31, 2021.

winter storm, February 11, 2018.

frozen pond, Downers Grove, January 6, 2018.

snow pile, Downers Grove, Illinois, February 11, 2018.

strip mall boutique, February 10, 2018.

fresh snow, February 13, 2021.

morning snow, February 15, 2021.

brick house in snow, February 11, 2021.

yellow house, February 24, 2021.

Kline Creek Farm, DuPage Co., (West Chicago), Illinois, May 21, 2016.

Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, June 9, 2018.

School of Music, Art, and Theater, Chicago, October 2015.